Activism

first_imgby, David Goff, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare2ShareEmail2 SharesThis feels to me like one of my most touchy subjects. I know some people who pretty much identify themselves with being an activist. To me (and mostly to them), that means that they are prone to see the goodness of their lives in terms of the causes they have fought against, for, been arrested about, or campaigns they’ve worked on. They have been at it since the Vietnam War, the environment has been a strong concern, and a myriad of social justice issues have been surfaced and attended to, by them. I know I can’t, and don’t want to, paint them with a broad all-inclusive brush. I know I have a lot to thank them for. So that makes what I want to explore, that much more difficult. I think that activism looks and feels different from the perspective of aging.Aging brings about change for some people. I am often fond of saying, that aging is a more effective consciousness-changer than even LSD has been. Wrinkles, medical and identity crises, losses of all sorts, and the approach of death, alters everything.  Life becomes something else.  So, in my opinion, does activism. I’ve noticed this has become important to me, as I’ve changed, and as I see many of my old behaviors in the new light aging reveals.To some extent I have identified as a social and environmental activist myself. One part has come out of my time as a park ranger, and another out of my passion for community. Both of them have grown with me, ripening as the years have passed. So that, the activism that now speaks to me is not the activism I grew-up with. This is a wonderful, paradoxical, poorly understood situation. Being active, and being an activist, isn’t what it used to be.  I like the change, I think it is a good one, and I’ve never heard anyone speak of it. So, I’m going to try to give this new form of activism a voice, and I’m also trying to convey why I think this is an important development.I’ve noticed that aging seems to be shifting my awareness, from outside to inside. Along with this move toward a more interior life, my sense of responsibility has blossomed. I’m much more likely now to confront my self than others. This has changed the focus of my activism in interesting and humbling ways. I tend to be a lot less angry about the way things are, instead I feel a lot more grief, and a great deal more responsibility. The old self-righteous high, I used to get when I arrived at some analysis of conditions, has given way, to a more compassionate viewpoint. I feel like I am deeper in our shared human dilemma.Depth seems to be the biggest change in my perspective. I’ve heard it said, that aging is about integration. For me that has been true. Now, for me, integration not only includes lining up thoughts and ideals to make sure they are congruent, but lining up my relationship actions, interior life, and sense of overall perspective. There is a continuum of connection that makes even the 1% my family. As a result, I feel I have to be at work cleaning up my own environmental messes, as I’m addressing someone else’s. Justice has as much an internal dimension as external. My doing of action now comes from a more being place inside.This change has been confusing, to me, and to others. Activism has always been associated with activity. Thus activism has unwittingly participated in the ageism that runs unconsciously rampant in this culture. If one pays attention, old people may be seen on the lines, but one seldom hears of activism growing up. The prevailing form of activism is still about changing the world — it is based on the assumption that by altering the world one alters the choices available.This is tantamount to one in a relationship assuming, that they should be able to alter their partner. Marriages, and all kinds of partnerships fail, because of that wrong-headed and immature assumption. Grown-ups know better, as a result now activism has more choices. There is a level of activism that is now possible; when social and environmental justice become fully about caring, instead of ideology, then it takes on a kinder, more responsible and friendly human face. I would add more effective, but I actually don’t know that yet. First, I need to escape my long association with the activity-preference of ageism, and then find more mature feet.I’d rather be changed by magnetism, being drawn voluntarily into a new world, than by the old methods of protest, harangue, guilt-induction, and interference. I think a deeper pursuit of change will probably be slow, but as I age, I see inherent wisdom in slowing down.I think I am a reborn activist, one who instead of always trying to change the world is learning more about what is. My hope, my current plan, is to align my actions more fully with what is miraculous about this world. I haven’t forsaken those less privileged than myself — I’ve just raised the bar, and conduct myself accordingly.Related PostsGero-Punk DharmaI have a recurring memory of meeting for an interview with one of my spiritual teachers.  How many years ago did this meeting take place? I think several, perhaps even a decade has passed.  I was struggling with memories around personal and family wounds over-taking me during my contemplation and…A Telling DisconnectI think what I saw was this 18-year-old’s inability to imagine herself aging into someone who looked like us. And I get that. It’s hard to imagine when you’re 18 and your body’s perfect, blooming, unblemished, perky, that you’ll ever look like someone decades older.Reunion: A Lesson In AgingHow could I have studied gerontology all these years and yet retained “a purely abstract notion” about aging?TweetShare2ShareEmail2 Shareslast_img read more

Bacteria adapted to the human body may become more susceptible to antibiotics

first_imgJul 6 2018A study of cystic fibrosis patients finds new evidence that infected bacteria lower resistance to antibiotics as they become ‘more comfortable’ in the bodyA new study published today in Nature Communications (noon, July 6, 2018), led by scientists at the University of Liverpool in collaboration with the University of Salford, finds evidence that as bacteria adapt to the human body, they can sometimes become more susceptible to antibiotics and therefore easier to kill.Antibiotic medications are used to kill bacteria, which can cause illness and disease. They have made a major contribution to human health. Many diseases that once killed people can now be treated effectively with antibiotics. However, some bacteria have become resistant to commonly used antibiotics.Antibiotic resistant bacteria are bacteria that are not controlled or killed by antibiotics. They are able to survive and even multiply in the presence of an antibiotic. Most infection-causing bacteria can become resistant to at least some antibiotics. Bacteria are increasingly becoming antibiotic-resistant, making infections such as pneumonia, tuberculosis harder to treat, leading to increased medical costs, prolonged hospital stays and higher mortality.Opportunistic organismPseudomonas aeruginosa is a species of bacteria that is able to survive in harsh environments. It is found widely in soil and stagnant water, and can infect humans and plants. It does not usually cause illness in healthy people, but is described as an ‘opportunistic’ organism, causing serious infection when our normal defenses are weakened. It is a major cause of lung infections, particularly in patients with cystic fibrosis.Researchers aimed to establish how the bacteria adapted to the environment of the lungs and whether this process impacted on bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment.Using models of long-term lung infection, the team identified mutations that appeared in the bacterial DNA over the course of infection and which led to changes in the ability of Pseudomonas to survive in the lungs. The mutations enabled the bacteria to attach to lung cells more effectively, and to resist defense molecules produced by the host immune system. Importantly however, the same changes also made Pseudomonas more susceptible to antibiotics, raising hopes that even bacteria that are well adapted to the lung environment could be combated with conventional antibiotics. The new study, published today (July 6 2018), sheds new light on how bacterial pathogens can change over the course of a single infection within a patient.Related StoriesStudy shows link between gut microbiome health and successful joint replacementCurved shape of bacteria can make it easier to find foodNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from withinCost of adaptionDr Daniel Neill, part of the team that led the study at the University of Liverpool, explains: “For a bacterium like Pseudomonas aeruginosa to survive in the lungs, it needs to adapt quickly. The human body contains an array of defenses that will quickly kill bacteria if they cannot find ways to protect themselves. The mutations we identified in Pseudomonas in this study were important in allowing the bacteria to resist an anti-bacterial enzyme of the host immune system called lysozyme. What surprised us was that this adaptation came at a cost, in that bacteria carrying the mutation were very readily killed by antibiotics”.Co-author Dr Ian Goodhead, lecturer in infectious diseases at the University of Salford continues: “In the case of cystic fibrosis, it’s clear that bacteria have a choice: survive in the lungs, or defend themselves against antibiotics. By adapting to the former, they become more susceptible to the latter, so there is a cost to the bacteria of being resistant.”Further work is ongoing to understand these processes, as Dr Joanne Fothergill, University of Liverpool explains: “When bacteria form infections within the lungs, they do so in the form of a complex population of microbes. Not every Pseduomonas aeruginosa is the same, not even within a single patient. We now need to understand whether the antibiotic-susceptible mutants we identified are protected during infection by living as part of a community alongside more resistant strains.”The team hope the findings may lead to better diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in people with cystic fibrosis, as Prof Aras Kadioglu, University of Liverpool, describes: “We found that these mutations appear early in infection and may originate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa living in the nose and sinuses. Children with cystic fibrosis are at a high risk of developing lung infections, but it may be possible to identify infection at an early stage by taking nose swabs to look for the presence of Pseudomonas. If the bacteria are there and are carrying the mutations we identified, it may be possible to treat the patient before lung infection becomes fully established.” Source:https://news.liverpool.ac.uk/2018/07/06/study-finds-bacteria-adapted-to-the-lungs-are-easier-to-kill-with-antibiotics/last_img read more

SP PennTech introduces RW500 rotary vial washer for biotech pharmaceutical applications

first_imgThe objective of vial washing is to remove particulate matter and microorganisms. Traditional vial washers employ many moving parts, and in particular, needles to direct wash water into the vials, which can lead to chipped vials and unwanted particulate matter. SP PennTech washers have only two moving parts inside the washing chamber, and do not use needles,  minimizing the chance of glassware damage and the possibility of an FDA 483 notice for a product containing unintended particulates.Related StoriesSP Scientific introduces new system for controlled rate freezing of biological materialsSP Scientific chooses Interphex 2019 to showcase Line of Sight freeze-drying technologiesHow expanding design space increases lyophilization cycle successSuitable for washing the full range of pharmaceutical vials from 2-100 ml, the RW-500 combines effective vial washing with automatic tray loading enabling outputs of up to 100 vials/ minute. Each vial format on the RW-500 has an HMI selected “recipe” with specific settings for such variables as spraying time and indexing time. Water for injection may optionally be recycled, filtered and reused for early wash stages, and intermittent spraying further reduces water consumption.The RW-500 rotary vial washer is designed as an efficient alternative to labor-intensive batch style vial washers. In comparison with in-line and batch washers, the RW-500 rotary washer design offers the benefits of minimal operator involvement, small footprint, optimized cleanliness and easy connection to infeed and outfeed in a production line.All RW series washers are designed to be simple in operation, self-draining, with no moving parts in the washing area and have minimal maintenance requirements. An easily removed one-piece transparent polycarbonate cover permits easy visual verification of the flow of washing media.Each vial neck format has its own dedicated set of change parts to optimize cleanliness, with a changeover easily manageable in under 15 minutes. All other changeover requirements, such as outfeed pusher movement and number of indexes per minute, are automatic and under PLC control. Source:https://sp-penntech.com/ Jul 17 2018SP PennTech announces the RW-500 rotary vial washer – a small automated system designed for low-to-medium output pharmaceutical and biotech applications.last_img read more

Coupling free malaria tests with diagnosisdependent vouchers can improve rational use of

first_imgCredit: President’s Malaria Initiative, Flickr Jul 18 2018Coupling free diagnostic tests for malaria with discounts on artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) when malaria is diagnosed can improve the rational use of ACTs and boost testing rates, according to a cluster-randomized trial published this week in PLOS Medicine by Wendy Prudhomme O’Meara of Duke University, USA, and colleagues. Related StoriesSouthern Research team aims to discover new, safer antimalarial medicinesGM fungus kills 99% of mosquitoes in Malaria-endemic region of AfricaStudy shows how the mosquito immune system combats malaria parasitesMore than half of all ACTs consumed globally are dispensed over the counter in the retail sector, where diagnostic testing is uncommon, leading to overconsumption and misuse of antimalarial drugs. In the new study, the researchers randomly assigned 32 communities in Western Kenya, with a combined population of 160,000, to control or intervention arms. Intervention arms had community health workers offering free malaria tests for any individual experiencing malaria-like symptoms. Those who tested positive for malaria received a discount voucher for ACT. In control areas, community health workers continued to provide health promotion and referral services according to government guidelines.Among all areas, between July 2015 and May 2017, 32,404 people were tested for malaria and 10,870 vouchers were issued for discounted ACTs. A total of 7,416 randomly selected participants with recent fever were surveyed. After 12 months, 50.5% of people surveyed in intervention areas, with recent fever, had taken a malaria diagnostic test, while only 43.4% of those with recent fever in control areas had taken a test (adjusted risk ratio 1.20; 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.38, p=0.015). Moreover, the rational use of ACTs— the proportion of ACT used by those testing positive for malaria—increased from 41.7% at baseline to 59.6% at 18 months in intervention areas, and the proportion of ACT dispensed to true malaria cases in the intervention arm was 40% higher than in the control arm (adjusted risk ratio 1.40; 95% CI 1.19–1.64, p<0.001).“Community-based interventions that include the private sector can have an important impact on diagnostic testing and population-wide rational use of ACTs, as well as potentially improve care for the millions of suspected malaria cases seeking treatment in retail outlets,” the authors say.center_img Source:https://www.plos.orglast_img read more

Study highlights hidden hazards of airborne antibioticresistance genes

first_imgJul 25 2018People are often notified about poor air quality by weather apps, and this happens frequently in urban areas, where levels of outdoor pollution containing particulates and soot are high. But now scientists are reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology that there is another type of air contaminant that they say isn’t receiving enough attention: antibiotic-resistance genes.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 2 million people in the U.S. become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria every year. Research has shown that antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) can move from bacteria to bacteria, or even from bacteria to the environment. For example, tetracycline-resistance genes have been found near animal feed operations, and β-lactam-resistance genes have been found in urban parks in California. These studies indicated that airborne transmission could be a factor in the spreading and exposure of ARGs. But current air pollution investigations typically don’t take ARGs into account. So, Maosheng Yao and colleagues wanted to examine airborne ARGs on a global scale.The team performed a survey of 30 ARGs across 19 cities around the world, including San Francisco, Beijing and Paris. The group studied ARGs resistant to seven common classes of antibiotics: quinolones, β-lactams, macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, aminoglycosides and vancomycins. Beijing had the most diverse group of airborne ARGs, with 18 different subtypes detected, while San Francisco had the highest overall level of airborne ARGs. Genes resistant to β-lactams and quinolones were the two most abundant types of ARGs in all the cities studied. Low levels of ARGs resistant to vancomycin, an antibiotic of last resort for MRSA treatment, were found in the air of six cities. Source:https://www.acs.org/last_img read more

Researchers study why young adults have higher tendency to waste food

first_imgAug 23 2018Globally, there has been much attention on avoiding or reducing food loss and food waste. But recent research has shown that young adults–18-to 24-year-olds–have a higher tendency to waste compared to other age groups.Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to get a better idea why this age group, especially those who are college students, are such high food wasters and how their residence type–on or off campus–plays a role. Findings from a study, published in the journal Appetite, show that during the transitionary time of young adulthood, many of the food management behaviors that might prevent food waste haven’t been learned yet or haven’t been necessary.If college students have eaten all their meals in all-you-can-eat university dining halls, for example, they may have not yet learned how to plan and grocery shop for meals. Other constraints like transportation and environment–maybe no access to a refrigerator to store leftovers–may also contribute.Results from the study can inform strategies to help young adults be more aware of food waste and adopt better food management behaviors.Cassandra Nikolaus, doctoral candidate in food science and human nutrition at U of I and lead author of the study, says another important finding was that many of the young adults in the study didn’t see their personal food-wasting behaviors as part of the overall problem of food loss and waste in the United States, nor did they think changing their behavior could help the problem.”We picked up on this desire to deflect. ‘It’s not me, it’s them,'” Nikolaus says. “Even with those living off campus, thinking about the grocers or restauranteurs and the portion sizes they are given, and even though we focused on individual behavior, retail-level waste came up several times,” she says.Nikolaus and study co-author, Brenna Ellison, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at U of I, conducted focus groups with young adults, ages 18-24, to find out more about their perceptions about food waste and their personal behaviors. Most of the participants were college students, some living on campus with access to university dining halls, and others living off campus.Participants were asked, for example, to describe their typical meals and where they are prepared, how knowledgeable they were about food waste in America, and how they dealt with leftover food on specific occasions.Similar themes emerged for college students and non-college students, but Nikolaus says there were differences in perceptions and behaviors between participants who lived on campus or off campus.”The way we will need to intervene to reduce wasted food will be different based on what young adults have access to,” Nikolaus explains. “One thing we highlighted was environmental constraints. We could tell a student living on campus all day about meal planning and grocery shopping, but how much shopping are they doing if they have a tiny refrigerator, and how does that really play into their overall pattern of eating?”A major theme that emerged was a sense of apathy about food waste, or the tendency to deflect. Many participants were not even aware of how much food is wasted, for example, in a university dining hall.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaCommunity-residing older adults benefit from food and nutrition programsResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repair”Many said these things are out of their control,” Ellison says. “Some participants said they had not been told they need to care about this. You could tell it is not something that has been ingrained in them through school education the way that things like climate change or recycling have been.”Nikolaus adds, “We found that several participants were very apathetic to food waste, though they probably wouldn’t put it in those exact words. They felt they couldn’t really do anything about it so they wouldn’t. This limited control led them to feel like ‘it’s not my problem,’ basically.”Some of the themes could be applied to other age groups, but the researchers were able to identify some behaviors that might specifically apply to young adults.”Of course people across all ages throw stuff out if they think it is spoiled,” Ellison says. “There’s some learning that happens with this age group, though, in that they’ve not been forced to cook for themselves or manage their own food. I think this shows that it is a bit more transitionary and they’ll get better as they get older.”Part of that learning and adapting comes when young adults also start managing their own finances, Nikolaus says. “One participant said, ‘I feel like I used to waste a lot more before I started buying my own groceries.’ So that transition from being in a dining hall where things are just appearing and disappearing, in contrast to purchasing your own groceries, is important. Those food provisioning and management behaviors are primarily taken care of for you while you are in a dining hall on campus,” she explains.The participants also offered intervention ideas to help reduce food waste within their age group. Having a visual representation of how much they are actually wasting and getting education in terms of food management–cooking for oneself, grocery shopping, and planning, combined with financial management, came up in focus groups.”This kind of goes back to something like recycling. It took a long time for recycling to catch on and for people to understand why you would want to do that,” Ellison says. “Making sure people know what they are wasting and understanding the consequences of that is important. Making waste visible is a first step in getting anyone to think about changing their behavior, to understand that there is something that’s a problem,” Ellison adds.Findings from the study were also used to help create a food-waste awareness campaign in U of I dining halls. “The best way to inform that campaign was to understand what motivates students to waste in the first place. To make sure we’re designing educational materials that makes sense for what this age group is thinking about related to food waste. We physically measured waste and put up a giant graph measuring their waste and giving them feedback.” Source:https://aces.illinois.edu/last_img read more

Earths lakes are warming faster than its air

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—The world’s lakes are warming faster than both the oceans and the air around them, a global survey of hundreds of lakes shows. The rapid temperature rise could cause widespread damage to lake ecosystems, say scientists who presented the findings today at the American Geophysical Union meeting here. The global effects could be even more serious, because higher lake temperatures could trigger the conversion of billions of tons of carbon stored in lake sediments to methane and carbon dioxide (CO2), in a feedback effect that could accelerate global warming.The temperature increase—a summertime warming of about a third of a degree per decade over 25 years—is “pretty modest,” says lake biologist Peter Leavitt of the University of Regina in Canada, who did not participate in the study. “But you don’t need 2°- to 3°- increases in lake temperatures to have profound impacts.”Many studies have shown that individual lakes are warming up in the summer. (Scientists rarely track lake temperatures in winter, when ice makes measurements more challenging.) The new study encompassed 235 lakes around the world, combining measurements by hand, which reach the depths of lakes, with satellite readings, which provide global coverage of lake surfaces. Over the study’s time period, between 1985 and 2009, a few lakes cooled whereas others warmed sharply, but the average warming of 0.34°C per decade was more than twice the 0.12°C per decade measured in the oceans over a similar period.center_img That the oceans lag isn’t unexpected, given their enormous mass, says Catherine O’Reilly, lead author on the study, which involved 64 scientists collecting data on six continents. But many lakes are warming even faster than surface air temperatures, which warmed by 0.25°C per decade between 1979 and 2012. “I would have expected that, on average, lakes would be warming more slowly than air,” says O’Reilly, a freshwater ecologist at Illinois State University in Normal.A shorter ice season because of warmer winters may help explain why. “Normally, ice is a good insulator protecting lakes from atmospheric heating,” Leavitt says. With ice melting earlier, lake water is exposed to warm spring air for longer. That probably explains why lakes that normally freeze in winter are warming by 0.48°C per decade, about twice as fast as lakes that don’t freeze.Another factor that may be accelerating the lake warming is a decline in cloudiness in some temperate areas, due at least in part to climate change. Clearer air allows more sunlight to strike lakes’ surfaces. And as lakes soak up more heat from the sun and the air, their waters become more stratified, with the less dense warm water floating on top of more dense cold water. The stratification prevents deep, cold waters from mixing into surface layers and cooling them in summer.The rapid summertime warming bodes ill for lake species. Freshwater fish that like the cold, such as lake trout, could suffer. So could species that rely on increasingly threatened lake ice. The Baikal seal in Russia’s Lake Baikal gives birth on the ice, points out biologist Stephanie Hampton of Washington State University, Pullman. Adds O’Reilly: “Large changes in our lakes are not only unavoidable, but are probably already happening.”Meanwhile, in warmer places, says Leavitt, “strong stratification and warm surface waters are the recipe for blooms of noxious and possibly toxic cyanobacteria, particularly in regions where agriculture and urbanization have fertilized the lakes and estuaries.”Warming lakes may have global implications as well, say the researchers, whose study will be published today in Geophysical Research Letters. As aquatic organisms die, their carbon-rich remains fall into the water column, where they can be stored in sediments or broken down by microorganisms into gases. “Lakes are already massive furnaces for processing terrestrial organic matter” and creating greenhouse gasses, Leavitt says. “Warming these regions further is likely to increase their role in combusting carbon to CO2.”The authors say their findings point to the need to update global climate models so they better predict lake warming. They’d also like to see better remote sensing techniques that can measure the temperature of smaller lakes, missed by current satellites. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Podcast An exoplanet with three suns no relief for aching knees and

first_imgListen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.  As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.  [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img

Scientists can see through these rodents

first_imgSeeing through objects may seem like something straight out of a comic book, but researchers have found a way to make entire animals transparent—from their brains to their bones. The method lets fluorescent proteins visibly shine through bodies, lighting up entire vascular systems (above) and other structures. To produce such light shows, researchers treat euthanized rodents with several organic solvents to remove the water and lipids that made them opaque. The technique is dubbed uDISCO because it’s a variant of the original DISCO technique, which stands for 3D imaging of solvent-cleared organs. Although other methods like CLARITY or PARS can similarly create transparency in animal tissues, uDISCO does it for the whole body in just a few days as opposed to weeks or months. This technique allows the highest resolution images yet for a whole body, its creators report online today in Nature Methods. That should help scientists better see how a disease affects neurons throughout the body—like how a stroke can cause neuromuscular weakness—because it’s nearly impossible to reconnect the millions of neurons throughout a rodent body once dissected. uDISCO isn’t just limited to nervous system studies, either. Its applications are nearly endless, giving any scientist the seemingly superhuman ability to see through rodents.last_img read more

Test your smarts on quantum teleportation animal communication more

first_img By cutting off food imports Whales Average Scientists last week identified a gene that might be behind this so-called “sixth sense”: Enter for a chance to win. We’ll select a new winner each week. Question Water bears How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel! You Time’s Up! The United Kingdom Transfers the “state” of quantum particles over vast distances. One group used the weirdness of quantum mechanics to send the state of a quantum particle of light, 6.2 kilometers across Calgary, Canada, using an optical fiber, while the other teleported the states of photons over 14.7 kilometers across Shanghai, China. Both advances could eventually lead to an unhackable quantum internet. But what else is quantum teleportation good for? Answer: more than war, but—sadly—much less than Star Trek. Top Ranker An Ig Nobel Prize. Technologist Thomas Thwaites wanted to know what it was like to understand the world from a nonhuman point of view. So he donned a goat suit—complete with prosthetic limbs and a special “stomach” to digest the grass he would be eating—and headed for the Swiss Alps. When he got there, he realized that the world of goats was intensely hierarchical and his only hope of fitting in was to befriend a goat buddy, Goat No. 18. Other Ig Nobel winners include scientists who study the personality of rocks and emissions “genius” Volkswagen. September 26, 2016 Antibiotic resistance Sweden. Designer babies aren’t on the drawing board—yet. But this latest foray into the controversial world of CRISPR is the first to use healthy human embryos; an earlier study in China used damaged ones to see what edits might make them HIV-resistant. The new study, which explores how genes regulate embryonic development, is in line with ethics resolutions passed last year by an international body of scientists, which said that gene-editing technology should not be used to modify human embryos that are intended to establish a pregnancy. Start Quiz Cockroaches Win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Just submit the required contact information to enter. Click to enter If you found that last question painful, consider engaging in this activity, which—according to new research—may alleviate pain: South Korea Brangelina’s breakup By cutting down on cow farts and belches. California is one step ahead of the rest of us when it comes to curtailing methane emissions. Last week’s law seeks to accelerate that process by limiting—wait for it—emissions from landfills and gassy cows. That’s right, the ruminants (along with other livestock) make up nearly one-third of methane emissions annually in the United States. One step to limiting this effluvium is by carefully processing one end product: manure. But how do you deal with the products that are a little less … solid? There, the science isn’t so clear, but researchers are exploring methods of breeding and feeding animals that will lead to lower levels of bovine bloating. New research shows that these creatures can survive the perils of outer space, thanks to a radiation “shield” baked into their genes: 0 Australian Aborigines. Australia is home to some of the earliest signs of modern humans outside Africa. Those signs—along with the continent’s unique languages and cultural adaptations—were enough to convince some scientists that the ancestors of the Aborigines were the first modern humans to surge out of Africa some 60,000 years ago. Not so, says a new trio of large-scale genetic studies. They suggest that, instead, nearly all Aborigines and Eurasians (which include Native Americans) descended from a single group of humans who left Africa between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago. The Chernobyl wolves Allows your body to be rebuilt as Napoleon, one cell at a time Blindsight Spatial awareness Australian Aborigines Riding in an elevator Mongolians By building solar school buses Last week, the United Nations General Assembly actually agreed on something, deeming this a “fundamental threat” to public health: Watching sad movies Taking genetics to the next level, scientists from this country are now trying to modify viable human embryos using the CRISPR gene-editing technique: Horses. Don’t let Mr. Ed fool you—we still can’t talk with horses—but our equine friends may be able to commune with us in another way. After some training, 23 horses learned to express their preference for wearing (or not wearing) a blanket by touching specific symbols on a board. Their wants were consistent with the weather—most asked for blankets when it was cold or rainy outside. Of course, horses aren’t the only ones who can communicate like this. So can dolphins, pigeons … and even humans. September 26, 2016 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Learn More Chemical signaling The Chima of Peru Horses Bed bugs Every Monday, The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something–give it a try! Zika Water bears. These tiny aquatic “extremophiles” have been known to endure the freezing temperatures of Antarctica and the ravages of outer space, where radiation can fatally fry DNA in a matter of minutes. But scientists have never known just how the bears—also called tardigrades—did it. Now, an analysis of their genome has provided an answer: a gene that makes a protein that wraps itself around DNA like a blanket, protecting it from x-ray–induced damage. Scientists are already thinking about ways the protein might be used to bioengineer organisms that can similarly survive space or to protect another animal—us—from deadly radiation. Spatial awareness. Or, more specifically, the body’s awareness of where it is in space. Proprioception, as it’s called, helps you shift gears in a car, type on a keyboard, and even walk upright when blindfolded. But two women lacked these abilities utterly, and even had trouble feeling objects placed against their skin. Scientists scanning their genomes discovered that they shared an extremely rare genetic mutation that may shed light on coordination and why some of us are so much more klutzy than others. LOADING Beams you up, duh Sweden Muppets Transfers the “state” of quantum particles over vast distances The Science Quiz Clairvoyance By plugging pipeline leaks Dropping water tables Score Two teams of researchers have set new distance records for something called quantum teleportation. Now, your question: What does it do? An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Transfers the molecular “blueprint” of matter from one node to another Parrots The Ainu of Japan Antibiotic resistance. As much as the Brangelina breakup might give you the chills, the chills you could get from failing antibiotic effectiveness are far more serious. That’s because microbes the world over are becoming resistant to existing drugs, including those that cause tuberculosis, malaria, and influenza. As part of its announcement, the United Nations committed member countries to fighting the emergence of these so-called “superbugs” through developing new vaccines and medicines and overhauling current practices of overusing antibacterial and antiviral medicines in animals and humans. Scientists laid to rest last week the theory that this group of people was the first to leave Africa more than 50,000 years ago: Watching sad movies. If you were old enough to see a PG-13 movie in 1997, chances are you went to see Titanic. And chances are you cried. You might have even seen the film multiple times, doing your part to make it the highest grossing sob fest in movie history. Now, a new study suggests why people want to see tragedies like Titanic over and over again: Watching dramas together builds social bonds and even raises our tolerance for physical pain. 0 / 10 Watching porn China By cutting down on cow farts and belches Last week, California signed into law a bill that calls for far lower emissions of greenhouse gases in the Golden State, including methane. What is one way in which lawmakers propose to reduce emissions? A MacArthur “Genius” Grant Enter the information below to enter the sweepstakes:Your information has been submitted.An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later.This email has already been entered.The email submitted is not a valid email.Incomplete form. Please fill out all fields. Select CountryAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntigua & BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaireBosnia & HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCanary IslandsCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChannel IslandsChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos IslandColombiaComorosCongoCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuracaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland IslandsFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreat BritainGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuyanaHaitiHawaiiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea NorthKorea SouthKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacauMacedoniaMadagascarMalaysiaMalawiMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMidway IslandsMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNambiaNauruNepalNetherland AntillesNetherlands (Holland, Europe)NevisNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalau IslandPalestinePanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairn IslandPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRepublic of MontenegroRepublic of SerbiaReunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSt BarthelemySt EustatiusSt HelenaSt Kitts-NevisSt LuciaSt MaartenSt Pierre & MiquelonSt Vincent & GrenadinesSaipanSamoaSamoa AmericanSan MarinoSao Tome & PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTahitiTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad & TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks & Caicos IsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUSAUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican City StateVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (Brit)Virgin Islands (USA)Wake IslandWallis & Futana IsYemenZaireZambiaZimbabweBy Entering you agree to receive email from AAAS about AAAS products and Services (you can opt out of these emails at any time). I would like to receive emails about products and services offered by AAAS advertisers.PRIVACY I have read and accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Submit The faster you answer, the higher you score! Challenge your friends and sign up for your chance to win a free digital subscription to Science. Tim Bowditch According to a new report, what animal might be better at communicating with humans than we thought? Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes Eating popcorn Share your score An Office of Research Integrity review An Ig Nobel Prize This researcher pretending to be a goat was one of last week’s recipients of what unusual honor? Cover billing on the Weekly World Newslast_img read more

Test your smarts on the tenacious hagfish and your bodys newest organ

first_img Recognizes faces. Scientists long assumed that brain development over time was due almost entirely to “synaptic pruning,” or the weeding out of unnecessary connections between neurons. But now, a new study suggests that brain tissue in an area dedicated to facial recognition grows and develops well into adulthood, reaching peak proficiency at about the age of 30. The finding may help scientists understand the social evolution of our species, as speedy recollection of faces let our ancestors know at a glance whether to run, fight, or woo. Silkworm moths. We’ve all heard the stories about humans losing their jobs to robots. But what about man’s best friend? Drug-sniffing dogs may soon have a competitor in the workplace: an insect-piloted robotic vehicle that could help scientists build odor-tracking robots to find disaster victims, detect illicit drugs, and sense spills of hazardous materials. The car’s driver is a silkworm moth tethered in a tiny cockpit so that its legs can move freely over an air-supported ball, which moves it to its destination. The insect drivers, which used their odor-sensitive antennae to reach their targets, did so almost as quickly as carless moths. That means, say scientists, that one day moth-driven robot cars could replace drug-sniffing dogs, especially if they can be genetically modified to detect a wide variety of smells. Time to start polishing up those résumés, pooches! Processes new smells Iceland Enter for a chance to win. We’ll select a new winner each week. ffennema/istockphoto All along the gut. How many organs do humans have? Some stop counting at 78, but that number is highly debatable. Now, a group of researchers suggests adding one more: the mesentery, a fatty membrane that connects our intestines to the abdominal wall. Scientists long thought that the membrane was fragmented—broken up into tiny sections. But new research shows that it is, in fact, one continuous structure, upending nearly 100 years of anatomical science. But is that enough for it to get its own designation? If it isn’t, the researchers say that it also may have another function: shuttling white blood cells around the intestines. Controls inhibitions Homosexuals Honeyguides Free weddings Greenland Gibbons Dinosaurs Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Later this year, parts of Finland, the Netherlands, and Canada will turn into minilaboratories for randomized trials of what social welfare policy? In other space news, astronomers have finally found the location of a set of fast radio bursts (FRBs), mysterious cosmic flashes discovered nearly a decade ago. What is behind these flashes? No one knows. Universal basic income An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Just submit the required contact information to enter. Behind the gall bladder Click to enter Memorizes new Lady Gaga lyrics Antarctica January 09, 2017 They wriggle out thanks to their loose skin. Emily/Flickr Roma Which of these planets got no love from NASA when it selected its next set of low-cost missions? 0 Mercury Question Mars A new study suggests it took these creatures many months to hatch from their eggs, possibly dooming them to extinction: 0 / 10 Recently, a group of researchers said humans may have one more organ than doctors realized. Where is it located? Jamaica giant galliwasps Top Ranker Pulsars at the center of the Milky Way In front of the thyroid They slime their way out of its hold. Dinosaurs. Scientists used to think that dinosaur eggs, like those of modern birds (their closest living relatives), hatched relatively quickly. But a new study of baby dinosaur teeth suggests that their eggs instead took between 3 and 6 months to hatch, twice as long as predicted. Those long times probably made it impossible for them to outcompete animals that reproduced faster than they did—like birds and mammals—after the asteroid strike that produced the world’s most well-known mass extinction. Take note, Hatchimals! How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel!center_img All along the gut How do hagfish evade a shark’s bite? Human infants Free housing January 09, 2017 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Learn More Universal basic income. The policy, which has its modern-day origins in post–World War II America and Britian, has enjoyed a recent resurgence, with governments from Oakland, California, to Ontario, Canada, launching experiments to find out how it could affect employment, taxes, and even health outcomes. A basic income is a guaranteed, regular sum of money paid from the government to citizens. The last time an experiment on this scale was run was in Manitoba, Canada, in the 1970s. Its findings? Scientists are still working on it. The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something–give it a try! Score Universal child care Enter the information below to enter the sweepstakes:Your information has been submitted.An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later.This email has already been entered.The email submitted is not a valid email.Incomplete form. Please fill out all fields. Select CountryAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntigua & BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaireBosnia & HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCanary IslandsCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChannel IslandsChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos IslandColombiaComorosCongoCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuracaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland IslandsFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreat BritainGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuyanaHaitiHawaiiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea NorthKorea SouthKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacauMacedoniaMadagascarMalaysiaMalawiMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMidway IslandsMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNambiaNauruNepalNetherland AntillesNetherlands (Holland, Europe)NevisNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalau IslandPalestinePanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairn IslandPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRepublic of MontenegroRepublic of SerbiaReunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSt BarthelemySt EustatiusSt HelenaSt Kitts-NevisSt LuciaSt MaartenSt Pierre & MiquelonSt Vincent & GrenadinesSaipanSamoaSamoa AmericanSan MarinoSao Tome & PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTahitiTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad & TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks & Caicos IsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUSAUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican City StateVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (Brit)Virgin Islands (USA)Wake IslandWallis & Futana IsYemenZaireZambiaZimbabweBy Entering you agree to receive email from AAAS about AAAS products and Services (you can opt out of these emails at any time). I would like to receive emails about products and services offered by AAAS advertisers.PRIVACY I have read and accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Submit Recognizes faces The Science Quiz Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes Share your score Surprisingly, a part of the brain that does this has been found to grow and develop into our early 30s: They shoot tiny bursts of electricity. Antarctica. Scientists have monitored a growing rift in that continent’s Larsen C ice shelf with increasing anxiety, especially after the breakup of the Larsen A shelf in 1995 and the sudden collapse of Larsen B in 2002. Now, it looks like Larsen C may be poised for its own big break: The 115-kilometer long rift, which is 100 meters wide and half a kilometer deep, grew by another 18 kilometers in December. If the ice breaks loose (which scientists say is likely in the coming weeks), it could form one of the largest icebergs ever recorded. By itself, that wouldn’t lead to a rise in sea levels—icebergs float, after all. But if the shelf collapses further, “unplugging” the glaciers that it currently holds back, sea levels around the world could one day rise by as much as 10 centimeters. The disabled Average Jews They twist themselves up in knots. Time’s Up! A new initiative in Germany will soon reconstruct the biographies of Nazi victims used in brain research. Who were most of those victims? The disabled. During World War II, the Nazi regime systematically killed at least 200,000 people it classified as mentally ill or disabled. Now, a new initiative is seeking to reconstruct the biographies of victims used in brain research. The Max Planck Society (MPG) will open its doors to four researchers who will scour its archives and tissue sample collections for material related to the program. The project’s impetus is MPG’s desire to take moral responsibility for unethical research that its forerunner, the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, conducted on the victims and their remains. Venus. No one said love was easy! The second planet from the sun got the shaft once again when NASA scientists dropped two potential missions to Venus last week in favor of two to mysterious asteroids. In the latest efforts funded by NASA’s Discovery Program, the Lucy spacecraft will hurtle toward Jupiter’s Trojan asteroids in 2021, and another called Psyche will launch in 2023 to orbit a large metallic asteroid of the same name. Little is known about either target, and scientists hope the visits will shed light on the early formation of our solar system. Meanwhile, Venus scientists are banking on one more funding opportunity: the New Frontiers mission, which NASA will decide by November 2017. If that fails, it could be another decade before the agency returns to Venus, a planet that it last visited in the early 1990s. Voyager’s Golden Record In the skull Distant antimatter explosions You Scientists recently taught this animal to drive a car, in a bid to create robots that would replace drug-sniffing dogs: They wriggle out thanks to their loose skin. Hagfish, a jawless, eellike fish that ties itself into pretzel-like twists to tear apart its dinner, are creatures best known for their slime, which gums up the gills of any predator who tries to eat them. But scientists witnessing a shark-on-hagfish attack have discovered that it’s neither slime nor knots that defeat a lunging shark. Instead, it’s droopy hagfish skin. Because their skin is only loosely connected to their internal muscles and organs, hagfish skin isn’t pierced when predators try to sink in their teeth. Instead, the skin just folds around the attackers’ teeth, giving the organs ample room to move out of harm’s way. Emus LOADING A chunk of ice the size of Delaware may soon split off the northernmost ice shelf of this place: Dodos Jupiter Venus The faster you answer, the higher you score! Challenge your friends and sign up for your chance to win a free digital subscription to Science. Canada Start Quiz Silkworm moths No one knows. Every day, space is filled with thousands of bursts of radio energy, enormous flashes that pack as much energy into a few milliseconds as the sun emits in all its wavelengths in half a day. Now, scientists know where some of them are coming from: a surprisingly small galaxy more than 3 billion light-years away. But they still don’t know what is causing them. In fact, there are more theories about FRBs than there are FRB signals, joked one of the lead authors on the paper. Among those theories: colliding neutron stars or neutron stars being eaten by black holes.last_img read more

Top stories Naked mole rat superpowers a deadly salamander disease and alternatives

first_img Email Science is covering the March for Science worldwide. Be sure to check out our live coverage on the day of here, and also see all of our stories on the march.With this new system, scientists never have to write a grant application againAlmost every scientist agrees: Applying for research funding is a drag. Writing a good proposal can take months, and the chances of getting funded are often slim. Funding agencies, meanwhile, spend more and more time and money reviewing growing stacks of applications. That’s why two researchers are proposing “self-organized fund allocation,” a radically different system that would do away with applications and reviews; instead, scientists would just give each other money. Top stories: Naked mole rat superpowers, a deadly salamander disease, and alternatives to grant writing Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country (Left to right): Danny S./Wikimedia Commons; Devrimb/iStockphoto; Neil Bromhall/Minden Pictures Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Ryan CrossApr. 21, 2017 , 4:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacksDoctors have lots of tools for predicting a patient’s health. But—as even they will tell you—they’re no match for the complexity of the human body. Heart attacks in particular are hard to anticipate. Now, scientists have shown that computers capable of teaching themselves can perform even better than standard medical guidelines, significantly increasing prediction rates. If implemented, the new method could save thousands or even millions of lives a year.Giant shipworms discovered hiding in sulfurous lagoonsDigging 3 meters down into the dark marine mud of a former log storage pond in Mindanao, Philippines, scientists have discovered five live specimens of an elusive creature previously known only through the 1- to 1.5-meter-long calcium carbonate shells it left behind. By carefully chipping away at the end of a chalky tube, researchers found a long, black, wormlike mass oozing from its casing—the first live specimen of the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamia.Naked mole rats can survive 18 minutes without oxygen. Here’s how they do itNaked mole rats are the superheroes of lab animals. They show few signs of aging, are resistant to some types of pain, and almost never get cancer. Now, scientists have discovered another superpower: The animals can survive more than 18 minutes without oxygen. They do that by essentially switching their bodies from using one fuel to another—a strategy that might point to new ways of combatting strokes and heart attacks in people.A deadly salamander disease just got a lot scarierEurope’s largest and best known salamander species, the fire salamander, is falling victim to a deadly fungus, and new research is making scientists more pessimistic about its future. A 2-year study of a population in Belgium, now entirely wiped out, has revealed that these amphibians can’t develop immunity to the fungus, as was hoped. To make matters worse, it turns out the fungus creates a hardy spore that can survive in water for months and also stick to birds’ feet, offering a way for it to spread rapidly across the continent. Two other kinds of amphibians, both resistant to the disease, also act as carriers for the highly infectious spores.last_img read more

The best way to reduce your carbon footprint is one the government

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The best way to reduce your carbon footprint is one the government isn’t telling you about Eating no meat cuts an individual’s carbon footprint by 820 kilograms of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, on average, about four times the reduction they’d get by recycling as much as possible. (Emissions generated by eating meat result, in large part, from the large amounts of energy needed to grow, harvest, and process feed crops.) Foregoing one round-trip transatlantic flight each year would cut a person’s emissions of CO2 by 1600 kilograms. Getting rid of their car would reduce emissions by 2400 kilograms, or 2.4 metric tons. And by choosing to have one fewer child in their family, a person would trim their carbon footprint by a whopping 58.6 metric tons—about the same emissions savings as having nearly 700 teenagers recycle as much as possible for the rest of their lives. Despite the effectiveness of these four measures, neither the textbooks in Canadian schools nor government reports or websites in the European Union, the United States, Canada, or Australia highlight these choices, possibly because most of them require such extreme changes in lifestyle. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Recycling and using public transit are all fine and good if you want to reduce your carbon footprint, but to truly make a difference you should have fewer children. That’s the conclusion of a new study in which researchers looked at 39 peer-reviewed papers, government reports, and web-based programs that assess how an individual’s lifestyle choices might shrink their personal share of emissions.Many commonly promoted options, such as washing clothes in cold water or swapping incandescent bulbs for light-emitting diodes, have only a moderate impact (see chart, below), the team reports today in Environmental Research Letters. But four lifestyle choices had a major impact: Become a vegetarian, forego air travel, ditch your car, and—most significantly—have fewer children. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img By Sid PerkinsJul. 11, 2017 , 4:30 PM The top ways to reduce your carbon footprint Thomas Hafeneth/creative commons Credits: (Graphic) J. You/Science; (Data) Seth Wynes and Kimberly A Nicholas, Environmental Research Letters (2017) Emaillast_img read more

Can a new study tell you how to avoid getting sick on

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) If you want to avoid catching a virus on a plane, take the window seat, avoid using the bathroom, and limit your interactions with the crew. Those are some of the take-home points from a new study that attempts to model how illness could spread around an aircraft. But because almost no sick passengers were part of the experiments, critics say you should take the new recommendations with a grain of salt.The study provides a “brilliant” blueprint for how a virus could move around a plane, says Ira Longini, a biostatistician at the University of Florida in Gainesville. But, he adds, “I don’t think it’s of tremendous epidemiologic interest.”Biomathematician Howard Weiss of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and a team of about 10 graduate students and postdocs set out on 10 different transcontinental flights ranging from 3.5 to 5 hours long. Using an iPad, the scientists logged the movements of every passenger and flight attendant on board. Email By David ShultzMar. 19, 2018 , 3:30 PM Unfortunately (or fortunately, for the passengers), the observed flights appeared to be filled with mostly healthy people, despite the fact that the data were collected during the North American flu season: “We observed about 1500 passengers on the flights and only one of the passengers was coughing moderately,” Weiss says. The researchers were also unable to detect any sign of viral genetic material in an analysis of 228 swabs taken from around the planes.The paper provides a blueprint for the transmission network—an outline of which passengers are connected and how. But without an understanding of how likely illnesses are to hop from one person to the next, the study cannot show how the virus moves through the network, Longini says. It’s like having a road map, but no information on how far or fast the cars can drive.To get around this, the researchers fed their model with transmission rates inferred from historical data—specifically one instance from 1977 in which 38 of 54 passengers and crew contracted an “influenzalike illness” while their plane sat on the tarmac for almost 5 hours with no air circulation. Then, they multiplied that rate times four to make it “kind of a worst-case scenario,” says first author Vicki Hertzberg at Emory University in Atlanta. With this high transmission rate, an infected passenger will cause 0.7 new infections per flight, the researchers write today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.However, Hertzberg notes that the decision to multiply the 1977 infection rate by four was “somewhat arbitrary” and that therefore the modeled number of new infections per flight is also arbitrary. “What we’ve shown is that there’s a perimeter of risk around the infection—one row ahead, one row behind, and two seats on either side—but beyond this perimeter, there’s very little risk,” she says. An infected crew member, however, could cause as many as 4.6 new infections per flight, even when using the fourfold lower rate of 0.0045 transmission per minute.However, Longini says without better data on the actual transmission rate, this is basically a wild guess. But he also says the study might still contain some news you can use to avoid getting infected. The window seats were the most isolated from contact with other passengers by far. Predictably, passengers that got up and moved around had more contacts than those who stayed seated, and this trend was particularly pronounced for passengers seated midcabin. Lastly, if you need to go the lavatory—head to the back of the plane: The lines there tend to be only half as long.The authors also stress that their model only applies to single-aisle flights ranging from 3.5 to 5 hours long. It also only considers direct, large droplet transmission of influenzalike illnesses. The way people move around on planes during longer or shorter flights or planes with other layouts will likely be quite different.How much risk mitigation these strategies might confer is difficult to say—probably not much considering how low the risk of infection is unless you’re sitting very close to a sick individual to begin with. Neither Hertzberg, Weiss, or Longini said they would be changing their travel habits in light of the findings. Can a new study tell you how to avoid getting sick on a plane—or just the best bathroom to use?center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe What are your chances of getting sick on a plane? A new study offers mixed answers. iStock.com/hadynyah Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Global warming may boost economic inequality

first_imgRising global temperatures have taken a disproportionate toll on poor countries in hotter parts of the world, including Nepal, where workers toil at a brick factory. As global temperatures have risen, some economies have wilted while others enjoyed an extra lift. The difference follows a geographic pattern, according to a new study: Hotter countries closer to the equator suffered, while cooler ones benefited. Global warming may boost economic inequality By Warren CornwallApr. 22, 2019 , 3:40 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Narayan Maharjan/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Small economic damages can have outsize effects, because those in one year can ripple out to future years, Burke says. For instance, an agribusiness that lost money in a heat wave might invest less in equipment or research. “Even small changes in the growth rate compound over time and you can see big effects,” he says.Hsiang, who was the lead author of a 2017 paper that concluded the U.S. economy would lose approximately 1.2% of GDP with a 1°C increase in average temperatures, cautions against giving too much weight to the numbers, especially the apparent gains for cooler countries. The approach doesn’t confirm the results with “real world evidence that it actually happened,” he says.Burke acknowledges that more complete economic data could make for more certainty. But he defends the results as “the best possible interpretation of the data,” and says they could feed discussions about whether richer nations responsible for the lion’s share of historic emissions should compensate poorer nations for climate damage. And both Hsiang and the Stanford researchers agree on the need for more research on climate and inequality. One big question: Does warming exacerbate inequality within a country? In the new study, the duo of climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh and economist Marshall Burke, both at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, used climate and economic models to tease out the economic impacts of climate change country by country, starting in 1961. Their model compared how each country performed in hotter and colder years, while accounting for other factors such as technological innovations and gyrations in the global economy. From each country’s response to temperatures, the modelers created two “worlds,” one reflecting actual global warming and another without greenhouse gas pollution.Comparing them showed that between 1961 and 2010, many countries near the equator, which are generally poorer, lost an average of more than 25% of potential growth in gross domestic product (GDP) because of global warming, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Many cooler, mostly wealthier countries, in contrast, enjoyed an economic bump of 20% or more, thanks to warmer weather. Since 1961, for example, Norway’s per capita GDP grew an extra 34%, while India lost almost the same amount. Noah S. Diffenbaugh; Marshall Burke Email Over the past half-century, climate change has been blamed for heat waves, flooding, and rising seas. Now, researchers say warmer temperatures are widening the chasm separating richer and poorer countries, effectively boosting the economies of many wealthy polluters while dampening growth in much of the developing world. As a result, inequality between the haves and have-nots is already 25% greater than it would be in a cooler world, the paper asserts.Though he disagrees about the numbers, University of California, Berkeley, economist Solomon Hsiang says the paper provides clear evidence that climate change has stunted economies in the developing world. “The study’s statement that warming should have already harmed economic opportunities in poor countries is extremely important,” he wrote in an email.The new work builds on previous research that found economic activity peaks at an average temperature of 13°C. Call it a “Goldilocks” condition that’s neither too hot nor too cold. Lower temperatures can hamper weather-dependent sectors like agriculture, but hotter temperatures can wither crops, sap workers’ energy, and exacerbate social conflicts. That study found that climate change could reduce overall global economic output by 23% by 2100.last_img read more

Top stories Jobs just for women fish losing their senses and the

first_img Men need not apply: university set to open jobs just to womenA Dutch engineering university is taking radical action to increase its share of female academics by opening job vacancies to women only. Starting on 1 July, Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands will not allow men to apply for permanent academic jobs for the first 6 months of the recruitment process under a new fellowship program.A growing sensory smog threatens the ability of fish to communicate, navigate, and survive (left to right): HERO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES; V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE; SARAH BICKEL Top stories: Jobs just for women, fish losing their senses, and the evolution of puppy dog eyes Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe When many people think of threats to the world’s fish, overfishing or vanishing reefs might leap to mind. Increasingly, however, scientists also worry about a subtler danger: how human activities might interfere with the senses fish use to perceive the world. Noise from ships and construction, murkier waters caused by pollution, and rising ocean acidification from the buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide are all possible culprits. In laboratories and in the wild, scientists study exactly how those factors might affect a fish’s ability to communicate, navigate, and survive.We may have helped give our canine pals ‘puppy dog eyes’Dog owners know the look: Your pooch stares up at you, eyes wide, and you can’t resist giving them a hug or favorite treat. A new study of dog facial anatomy suggests we may have helped create this expression by favoring canines with “puppy dog eyes” over the course of thousands of years of dog evolution.This rock-eating ‘worm’ could change the course of riversShipworms have long been a menace to humankind, sinking ships, undermining piers, and even eating their way through Dutch dikes in the mid-1700s. Now, researchers have found the first shipworm that eschews wood for a very different diet: rock. The new shipworm—a thick, white, wormlike creature that can grow to be more than a meter long—lives in freshwater.These are the countries that trust scientists the most—and the leastNearly three-quarters of people worldwide solidly trust scientists: That’s one of the main findings of the Wellcome Global Monitor, a new survey that asked 140,000-plus people in more than 140 countries how they think and feel about health and science. Other polls have asked similar questions, but this one claims to be the first to study on a global scale how attitudes vary by nationality, gender, income, and education. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Alex FoxJun. 21, 2019 , 1:50 PMlast_img read more

DLP Wesley candidate promises humility honesty integrity and a development focus on

first_imgShareTweetSharePinGrant addressing supporters during his launch at WesleyDominica Labour Party (DLP) candidate for the Wesley constituency, Fidel Grant said he pledges to serve all Dominicans with humility, honesty and integrity.Grant made the statement at his launching ceremony in Wesley on June 16th,2019.“I stand here tonight to present myself to Dominica…to pledge that I will serve you with humility, honesty and integrity. To pledge that I will avail myself to all; the weak, the elderly, the working class, the fluent, to help make a difference for each life that I will come in contact with,” he stated.He continued, “I am the son of a farmer and a single mother who work all jobs…to make ends meet, who for the most of her life was unemployed. I know what it is to be poor… what it is to be without. Single mothers I know your struggle, I know what you are facing, I saw my mother’s experience. For 10 years I was employed as finance manager of the National Development Foundation of Dominica (NDFD), it was there I began working with you, the small business owner, the farmers, the fishermen and many of you in my consistency.”Grant further stated that major improvements have been made in Dominica over the past 20 years.“20 years ago, it took us two hours to get to Roseau from this consistency…it now takes 45 minutes to get to Roseau. 20 years ago, we had no school bus transporting our school children to and from school. 20 years when I attended college there were only 5 [students] from this constituency, today there are over 50 young people from this constituency attending the Dominica State College (DSC). 20 years ago, university was a luxury for many in Dominica, today this government is spending millions on university fees for our young people. I am happy to report 5 young people from this consistency will leave for university in September and this number is likely to increase.”He said one of his main areas of focus will be on his constituency’s agricultural sector.“Farmers, I present myself ready, ready to march into battle with you, ready to explore new strategies with you. Together, we have formed our plans for the future of this constituency and I must say the future of Wesley/Woodford Hill looks bright,” he said.The DLP Wesley candidate identified farming as one of his priority areas and assured his supporters that the labor party administration will continue with its commitment to the farmers of Wesley and Woodford Hill. “The prime minister has advised me that soon we’ll commence repair of the Mango Gutter Road and then one by one, we will see the rehabilitation of each and every farm access road,” he stated. “We will complete the agricultural stations at Londonderry and Woodford Hill. This labor party will continue to provide imports free of charge and at a concessionary rate.”Grant said he knows the vision and struggles of his people and will find ways to improve their lives and serve them in a new and greater capacity.A section of the DLP Wesley crowdlast_img read more

I do not need your congratulations Skerrit to EU on Dominicas removal

first_imgShareTweetSharePinPM Skerrit. File photoPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit is still unhappy about Dominica’s inclusion in the EU’s blacklist despite the country’s recent removal from that list.The list was announced on March 12th, 2019 and consisted of 15 countries which included Dominica, along with Barbados, Belize, Trinidad and Tobago, the U.S. Virgin Islands and United Arab Emirates, among others.The government said then that it was extremely disappointed in the new tax haven blacklist which was adopted by EU Finance Ministers and in particular by Dominica’s inclusion on the list. A release issued by the government stated that the list “unfairly and without proper justification names and shames countries as non-cooperative tax jurisdictions.”The government complained that the ratification of an OECD convention was the main cause of Dominica being on the blacklist and the only reason why the country had not signed and ratified the OECD Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance as amended ‘is that the OECD has to date not given the go ahead to Dominica to sign on.”Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime Minister, Gaston Browne also expressed concern about the black listing of Dominica.“Dominica in its present circumstances, having been struck by two hurricanes, trying to recover and the EU is targeting poor Dominica,” Browne stated.Dominica was subsequently removed from the list in May 2019.Speaking  at a ceremony to celebrate the 208th anniversary of Venezuela, the prime minister reminded his audience of his government’s earlier position that the inclusion of Dominica on the blacklist was an injustice to the country.“We are seeing some movements in the world to try to recolonize the region and they are unable to do it politically, so they are doing it through the economic instruments,” Skerrit said. “We have suffered for this where for example, the European Union black-listed Dominica for no reason whatsoever. So, even when they called me and say they have removed Dominica from the black list and they extend their congratulations to us, I said I do not need your congratulations.”Skerrit added that Dominica should receive compensation instead of being congratulated.“You cannot extend an injustice to my country and then when you have sought to undo the injustice, you’re congratulating me. You should be indicating to me as the leader of country what form of compensation you should be giving to us for denying us of our right for self determination, but in this world…there are nations that are more powerful and have control over the economic instruments and they impose this on us,” he argued.The Prime Minister thanked the People’s Republic of China for standing as a beacon of principle in this world and defending nations like Dominica against injustice.last_img read more

District superintendent discusses the impact of lack of funding

first_imgDistrict superintendent discusses the impact of lack of funding By Toni Gibbons Navajo County School Superintendent Jalyn Gerlich did a presentation to the Snowflake Unified School District Governing Board at the April 11 meeting regarding the impacts of Proposition 421, the Jail District Tax, that willSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Photo by Toni GibbonsNavajo County School Superintendent Jalyn Gerlich (pictured) talks with the Snowflake Unified School District Governing Board about the issues surrounding Proposition 421, the Jail District tax.center_img April 18, 2019last_img