John Kirwan on upholding the tradition of the Baa-Baas

first_imgBarbarians v Australia, Twickenham, Sat 1 Nov, 2.30pm KOWant to know what else is in the mag this month? Then click here to find out. Tactical mind: John Kirwan plots the Wallabies downfall John Kirwan: “Coaching the Barbarians again is an honour and I see it as my responsibility to uphold our prestigious name and make sure it continues to be a viable option in the professional era.I need us to keep that tradition alive by playing incredibly well. What I’ve always liked about the Baa-Baas is their sense of fun and old-fashioned values. In a way, the Baa-Baas embody the ethos of rugby and that needs to be maintained. We need to compete, so we’ve put the best footie team forward to do that. Rugby is still the game I love and I think it’s really important we have occasions like this.Whenever you talk to the players, they really enjoy the week preceding a Baa-Baas Test. The last time I coached the Baa-Baas in London was in 2011, when my captain was World Cup winner John Smit. I spent a hugely enjoyable week with him. It’s usually Kiwis knocking ten bells out of South Africans and vice versa, but throw in a few Scottish and Argentinian guys, some South Sea Islanders and suddenly you have a really good mix and everyone gets on.Having fun: Nick Cummins is entering the Baa-Baas spiritWe’re desperate to give Australia a real game, especially at the start of their tour. I’ve been digging into my contacts book to pick the cream of the southern hemisphere talent. Big Frank Halai isa real excitement machine and it’s the same with Francis Saili – the wings are bigger than the locks. We’ve also got Nick Cummins operating in a roving role out wide. ‘The Badge’ can do what he wants! He’s a great guy.I will also pick a few exciting southern hemisphere players on the cusp of Test call-ups, so it will be a huge opportunity to showcase their talent on the big stage. They know a fair few of the Australians, which should really add some spice. Game-changer: Quade Cooper gives the Wallabies an extra attacking dimensionThe Wallabies gave us a cuffing (60-11) back in 2011 and we won’t want a repeat of that. They play a good style of footie so it should be a spectacle for fans. Under new coach Michael Cheika, they will be desperate to find a way to win. They’ve got some real balance, in the loose forwards especially. Take Michael Hooper – he’s a special player. A few years ago they may have said he’s too small for this level, but he’s rapid and a great breakdown operator. In the backs, someone like Quade Cooper can change a game and Israel Folau is Australia’s Sonny Bill Williams. He has incredible handling skills. Given an inch, he’ll punish you.I’m also looking forward to being back at Twickenham. You always get crowds. Last time I was there I snuck out into the car park and had a beer. That’s the sort of tradition you want kept on! You want to play at a sporting theatres like that.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS John Kirwan has yet again taken up the reins of the Barbarians to see if he can cause an upset against the Wallabies. Here he explains what the Baa-Baas mean to himlast_img read more

Ireland: Five things we learnt v England

first_imgAn 11-point loss, but there were causes for optimism at Twickenham for an injury-depleted Ireland side, with Italy and Scotland up next, they could finish with a flouris Top scorer: Conor Murray has dotted down for all of Ireland’s tries By Whiff of CorditeEngland ultimately overpowered Ireland to win by more than a score but the outlook for Ireland was weirdly positive. A measure of how far they’ve sunk in the last twelve months perhaps, or a realistic assessment given the high number of debutants and off-the charts injury problems? Here are our views on a day of mixed emotions.It was about as good as losing by 11 points to England gotThe French defeat felt somewhat empty, because it was obvious Ireland had lost to a malfunctioning and patently unfit side, but there was plenty of encouragement to take from this game; so much so that the overall sense was one of pride in the team in their courageous defence and refusal to buckle when England threatened to run away with it.Handful: Ireland didn’t have anyone who could stop a rampaging Billy Vunipola on SaturdayWe don’t have a player in the Billy Vunipola mould, few teams do, and he was more or less unplayable on the day. Yet, apart from Big Billy, there was little to choose between the sides.Fundamental concernsFor all the misplaced handwringing about Ireland’s style of play and lack of offloads, the biggest problem has in fact been a decline in the basics which proved the building blocks of their success in the last two years. The much-fabled hyper-efficient rucking went down the toilette against France, while Ireland’s ability to reclaim high kicks has disappeared, and they haven’t aerially dominated any team in this campaign.Set-piece concerns: The lineout, once a strength, has been misfiring in this Six NationsThe would-be catchers have knocked on a huge amount of contestables. The other weak suit this year has been the lineout, and Ireland have too often failed to secure their ball from precious lineouts in the opposition 22. It’s an expensive habit. Ireland’s defence also looks oddly passive, constantly on the back foot once the ball is thrown wide. They repeatedly gave up easy metres here.Ver Kidz to the Fore Much of the encouragement comes from the performances of the three debutants, in particular the explosive impact of Connacht second-row Ultan Dillane. You wait and you wait for a tackle-breaking ball-carrying strongman in the second row and then two come along in the space of a couple of years.Off to a flier: Josh Van der Flier impressed on his debut at TwickenhamJosh Van der Flier’s one-two-one link-up with him to almost secure a try hinted that he may yet be the – Irish Rugby Commentariat Moment coming up – Genuine Openside™ that we’ve been looking for since… ever. Stuart McCloskey mixed things up a bit, and earned some critique from Joe Schmidt, but he showed some of his barnstorming capabilities in the wide channels, and is worth another go in the remaining matches.Too much rugby?Ireland don’t play any rugby; so goes the popular thinking in pubs and opinion pieces, but if anything they were guilty of playing too much rugby here, especially in their own half. However, early in the second half they did show an ability to make metres by going wide. Johhny Sexton showed that class is permanent by producing a vintage display – as well as nailing his kicks superbly – and pulled the strings expertly.In the clear: Johnny Sexton put in a vintage performance against England making several line-breaksConor Murray had another fine match and is Ireland’s top – okay, only – try scorer of the tournament. We can only hope that the decision to keep the pill and try to find space will reap greater rewards against Scotland and Italy, who are defensively less efficient than England.Form worriesRob Kearney was a little improved but has been way off his best for some time. Andrew Trimble had an alarmingly poor game, dropping balls and missing tackles. He is starting to look slow for a test wing.All wrapped up: Rob Kearney hasn’t exerted the influence he can have for a whileAnd while Cian Healy is only returning from injury, his lack of any sort of form and dire scrummaging performances have been the story of his season. Does it do him any good to be rushed back into this sort of arena. History has shown us that test rugby is no place to try and play into form. Alternatives may well be worth a look.center_img For the latest Rugby World magazine subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Rugby statistics hide the failings of France in attack during Six Nations

first_img Modern sport loves its statistics. Some sports – cricket, for instance – always have because of their nature, but a surfeit of stats is a relatively recent phenomenon in rugby. Some serve a purpose, others don’t, and a few are downright misleading.One stat that has been bandied about recently, somewhat aimlessly, like a ball travelling along a French back-line, is that Les Bleus are the top offloaders in this season’s Six Nations with 59, more than triple England‘s total. To some, these rugby statistics are evidence that France are in the throes of rediscovering that famous old flair.The reality paints a different picture. France may be offloading, but with little intelligence or accuracy. Against Scotland – as against Wales – the French were guilty on several occasions of forcing the offload when it just wasn’t on. It’s a mix of poor execution and poor decision-making, but they’re only obeying instructions.Throw your own way: Virimi Vakatawa passesLast November Guy Novès gave an extensive interview to Midi Olympique in which he spoke optimistically about the future now that he had replaced Philippe Saint-André as national coach. Taking encouragement from Argentina‘s display at the World Cup, particularly their brilliant performance in beating Ireland 43-20 in the quarter-final, Noves said: “I saw then the start of a new vision…of a modern rugby which can be played despite not possessing the physical means of the Boks or the All Blacks.”In Novès’s mind, the Pumas were winning “but also giving pleasure to the spectators” with their offloading game, and it was a theme he continued at the start of this year when he spoke again to the paper. Peppering the conversation with words such as ‘intelligence’, ‘improvisation’ and ‘adaptation’, Novès declared: “I would like to give the players the freedom to use their initiative on the pitch”. Novès is to be applauded for his bold philosophy – which is the opposite of Saint-André’s rigid, power-based game plan – but nonetheless it’s doomed to fail on two counts.First because this generation of French players is not technically proficient to play the rugby that their coach demands. In his interview with Midi Olympique, Novès mentioned three players he’d played with or coached, who he wished this team to emulate: Thomas Castaignède, Denis Charvet and Erik Bonneval. We all like to dream but unfortunately there’s no French back today who comes even close to matching that trio’s innate talent. Why? Drop off: Jules Plisson drops the ball in front of Yoann Maestri LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The France coach will thus be forced to field inexperienced players against the Pumas, which at least will keep the statisticians busy as they keep track of the record defeats.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img Jumping up a level: Paul Jedrasiak against WalesSaint-André suggested to BT Sport on Monday evening it’s because of a lack of opportunities for young French players in the Top 14. The ‘too many foreigners’ argument. That’s a cop-out. The bottom line is that young Frenchmen – like Camille Chat and Paul Jedrasiak – will break through if they’re good enough. But in most cases they’re not. Another ex-Bleus coach, Bernard Laporte, recognises this, which is why he’s campaigning to be the next president of the FFR on a platform of revolutionising the way rugby is coached to youngsters by hiring as many as 200 full-time coaches who will work with schools and academies to improve the core skills. In a recent interview Laporte lamented the skills of the current generation of French players, saying: “Virgile Bruni, who I’ve coached at Toulon, doesn’t know how to pass off both hands, while New Zealanders learn that from an early age.”The second reason why Novès will fail is that initiative and imagination have been coached out of French players for the best part of a decade. As aficionados of the Top 14 will attest, the majority of clubs play conservative and risk-averse rugby, their coaches screaming instructions from the touchline to make sure their players do as they’ve been programmed in training. Novès was guilty of this during his time in charge of Toulouse, regularly being caught on camera waving three fingers in the air whenever his side were awarded a penalty within range of the posts.Say what you see: Guy Noves watches his players warm upNow he’s telling his players to play what they see, improvising and off-loading in a manner in which they rarely do for their clubs. It’s an alien approach for this generation of players, who in general are over-coached and not trusted by their club coaches to think for themselves.As for Argentina, they are only going to get better between now and the 2019 World Cup given that the Jaguares are playing Super Rugby with a squad that is the nucleus of the Test side. In effect, it’s an international match every time the Jaguares play, which is ominous for Novès.He takes France to Argentina in June for a two-Test series but will do so without players whose clubs are involved in the semi-finals of the Top 14. The clash of dates means Novès is likely to head south without the likes of captain Guilhem Guirado, Maxime Mermoz, Wesley Fofana, Scott Spedding, Maxime Machenaud and Wenceslas Lauret. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

Church continues to keep Sandy Hook victims in thoughts, prayers

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Gun Violence jim poole says: December 21, 2012 at 7:47 pm EVERY church in the diocese should ring its bell 26 times at 9:30 AM DAILY until EFFECTIVE gun control laws are enacted by our Congress, to commemorate the 26 persons lost in Connecticut, not to mention those lost in Colorado and other states to gun violence.This tragedy must not be lost in our daily activities; we must keep it in mind, every day, until our Congress stops access to automatic weapons in our Nation! EVERY church in our diocese should ring its bell 26 times at 9:30 AM DAILY until EFFECTIVE gun control laws are enacted by our Congress. Comments (3) Rector Pittsburgh, PA December 18, 2012 at 5:33 am God hears our prayers. Legislators need to hear our voices. I encourage all people of faith to contact their state legislators and President Obama and demand a ban on assult weapons. December 17, 2012 at 7:16 pm I just wanted to say that we are praying for your stricken families here in England too. I wish there was more I could do, more that anyone could do, to ease the pain of those families. My heart goes out to them, and I must trust that they will find some comfort in the prayers of so many, near and far. Our thoughts are with you all. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Wooden angel figures are seen placed in a wooded area beside a road near the Sandy Hook Elementary School for the victims of a school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut December 16, 2012. Twelve girls, eight boys and six adult women were killed in the shooting on Friday at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. REUTERS/Mike Segar[Episcopal News Service] Thoughts, prayers and expressions of sorrow flowed in from Episcopalians across the United States and from Episcopal Church partners in the world-wide Anglican Communion in response to the Dec. 14 shooting massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School.On Friday, a gunman forced his way into the school, killing 26 people, 20 of them first-grade students, including Ben Wheeler, whose family attends Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown, Connecticut.In a Dec. 15 statement posted on the Diocese of Connecticut’s website, the bishops specifically asked for prayers for Ben and his family. Besides Trinity, a second Episcopal church, St. John’s in Sandy Hook, sits adjacent to the elementary school. No one at St. John’s lost loved ones in the tragedy, the statement said.Bishop Ian Douglas, Bishop Laura Ahrens and Bishop James Curry of the Connecticut diocese spent Dec. 15 at Trinity. The Rev. Kathie Adams-Shepherd, Trinity’s rector, read the 23rd Psalm at an interfaith service attended by President Barack Obama Sunday evening at Newtown High School. Trinity’s music minister, Fiona Smith Sutherland, coordinated the music for the Dec. 16 service.Also, on Dec. 15, the Connecticut bishops ordained three new priests, each bishop beginning the service with a time of silence and then by reading the collects on page 494 in the Burial Service in the Book of Common Prayer.Thoughts and prayers have come in from across the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion, with Bishop Robert Gillies of Aberdeen and Orkney in the Scottish Episcopal Church writing a special collect for the Diocese of Connecticut.The diocese has created a disaster response page and also liturgical and musical resources in response to the massacre.In her sermon Dec. 16 at Church of the Church of the Resurrection in Lexington, Kentucky, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori urged those present to find something to rejoice about.“Even in the face of the pain around us, we are here to discover joy – today and every day,” she said.But later, she directly addressed gun violence.“Given what happened in Connecticut on Friday, is there a place for a precise, even surgical, strike against gun violence?” she asked.“When nearly 3,000 young people in this country die every year from guns, wise heads must get to work and find a creative and life-giving response.  The deadly snakes out there are peddling and profiting from guns while children die.  What is a good-news response?  Other nations have found ways to limit access to assault weapons while still permitting people to shoot clay pigeons and hunt game.“Other smart adders might look at the loneliness and lostness around us.  The young shooter in Connecticut seems to have been mentally ill – his former classmates aren’t terribly surprised at what’s happened.  We’ve heard almost exactly the same thing every time one of these events has occurred in recent years.  Preventing more of them is going to mean greater watchfulness and a willingness to reach out to the outcast, the one who doesn’t fit, the kid who sees nothing to live for.  It means loving the ones who don’t seem terribly lovable, and that’s exactly where Jesus would be and what he’d be doing.”In his Dec. 16 sermon, the Very Rev.  Gary Hall, dean of Washington National Cathedral, reminded those present that the shooter was human.“And then from the parents [of the children] my thoughts go to the shooter. While I resist the temptation to speculate about his mental or emotional state, it’s hard to imagine someone carrying out such an act who wasn’t in an awful lot of psychic pain themselves. We reflexively turn to calling such people ‘evil,’ as if in so doing we mark them as somehow different from us.“Was the shooter ‘evil’? In the sense that he caused a lot of innocent suffering, yes I suppose he was. But can we call him ‘evil’ as a way of excluding him or his actions from the realm of humanity? No, I don’t believe we can,” Hall said. “We need to understand his action – and the actions of all violent people – as a part of what it means to be human.“Like it or not, we are bound up with each other in a complex matrix of motivations and actions. To understand is not to excuse. Let’s not apologize for the shooter, but let’s not try to pretend that he’s someone other than us, either. If he was mentally ill, he was also a member of a family, and we know that existing laws make it very difficult for families to control or institutionalize their violent members.”He later said that he’d had enough.“Which leads me to say, on behalf of this faith community at least: Enough is enough. As followers of Jesus, we have the moral obligation to stand for and with the victims of gun violence and to work to end it. We have tolerated school shootings, mall shootings, theater shootings, sniper shootings, workplace shootings, temple and church shootings, urban neighborhood shootings, for far too long… “Washington Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde joined Hall on Dec. 14 in calling on national leaders to enact more effective gun-control measures.The bishops in the Diocese of New York issued a pastoral letter Dec. 17, calling for “creation of responsible, constitutional measures of reasonable and effective gun control.”“Over and over, we watch the horror, the pain and the grief laid upon the shoulders of people like us in communities like our own, who must then bear that horror and carry that pain as they pick up their lives and find a way to go on.  As in far too many other places in America, Newtown will never be the same.  The events of Friday will cast a shadow into the future which will darken much that is yet to come.  And for the families of the lost, especially the young lost children, these losses will temper every happiness and cloud every joy for a long time.  We pray God’s blessing, we ask God’s grace, we invoke God’s peace for every troubled heart,” the bishops wrote.“But this was the second mass shooting in America in three days.  It was the 13th in 2012.  We, your bishops, believe that it is past time for the United States to commit itself anew to the creation of responsible, constitutional measures of reasonable and effective gun control.  We call on our elected representatives to engage the debate, resolve the question and come to terms finally with the place and power of arms and weapons in our laws and in our common life, that we may by the grace of God and the courage of good national leaders live in peace and without fear in safe towns and cities, in safe schools, in safe movie theaters and shopping centers.”In 2011, the Diocese of Chicago and Bishop Jeffery Lee made combating gun violence a priority in response to an increase in gun-related violence, which affects a high proportion of children,. Even before the Dec. 14 massacre, members of the diocese planned to participate in a “Silent Nights” vigil Dec. 17, an opportunity for people of all faiths to work and pray for nights whose silence is unbroken by gunfire and to urge the governor and state legislators to pass gun control laws“I am heartbroken and horrified by the news of the massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, this morning,” said Lee in a Dec. 14 post on the diocesan website.  “People who live in the Diocese of Chicago are achingly familiar with the fear, anxiety and grief that comes from living in an area in which guns are too readily available and too frequently used. Yet even as someone who lives with the shaming reality that we cannot protect our young people from gun violence, I am stunned by the madness that unfolded today in Connecticut.”At Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland, Ohio, Dean Tracey Lind began the Dec. 16 11:15 a.m. service with a moment of silence and prayer for those who lost their lives in the massacre and then called on the congregation to send letters urging Ohio’s governor not to sign a gun-related bill passed by the state’s legislature. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Church continues to keep Sandy Hook victims in thoughts, prayers Leaders urge gun control laws The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By ENS staffPosted Dec 17, 2012 Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ms J A Lee says: Lucinda Tatman says: Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

South Carolina continuing Episcopalians meet to plan their future

first_imgThe Rt. Rev. Charles vonRosenberg, newly elected bishop provisional of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina, promises during a Jan. 26 gathering at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, to “observe, and to the utmost of my power, fulfill, the responsibilities and obligations of this office, striving in all things to be a faithful shepherd to the flock of Christ.” ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service – Charleston, South Carolina] Meeting in a town nicknamed the Holy City because of its founders’ religious tolerance and in a church that has survived the Civil War, great storms and an earthquake, Episcopalians in South Carolina turned to face their future.Continuing Episcopalians from around what is known as the Lowcountry portion of South Carolina met Jan. 26 at Grace Episcopal Church, which was festooned with flowers and overflowing with people. Many participants expressed the desire for healing and new beginnings.The day began with Holy Eucharist, during which Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori told the congregation in her sermon that “we all have a responsibility to be shepherds, to help others find their way through the gate of abundant life.”Referring to the Good Shepherd portion of the Gospel of John, she urged Episcopalians who encounter people who have left the Episcopal Church to “consider that some of the sheep may think they’re listening to the voice of the Good Shepherd.”“Some are also simply exhausted. What about the sheep who aren’t in the fold, who don’t know there is a feast to be found, rest for the body and soul, and partners who are willing to wrestle with the dictates of petty deciders or wolves who masquerade as sheep?”Jefferts Schori told the story of a glider pilot who local authorities accused of flying too near a nuclear power plant and then arrested, despite lacking any authority to take him into custody. She said the story was “indicative of attitudes we’ve seen here and in many other places.”“Somebody decides he knows the law and oversteps whatever authority he may have to dictate the fate of others who may in fact be obeying the law – and often a law for which this local tyrant is not the judge,” she said.“Most of us don’t live in a world where one person is the ultimate decider – because, over and over again, we’ve discovered that better decisions are made when they’re made in communities with appropriate checks and balances,” Jefferts Schori said. “Power assumed by one authority figure alone is often a recipe for abuse, tyranny and corruption.”However, she said, “the question is less about who’s right and who’s wrong in the midst of the current controversies.”“It’s more about how we deal with those who disagree – the other sheep in the flock and the variety of shepherds around us,” she said.Noting “God’s feast doesn’t need ‘keep-out’ signs,” Jefferts Schori said: “The banquet table is spread with abundance for all, even though it’s hard to join the feast if you’re busy controlling the gate.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori exchanges a fist bump with Hank Mengedoht, 6, while his brother, Teddy, 8, looks on Jan. 25 during a reception with her at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Their mother, Katherine, said she and her husband, Dan, brought the boys and their 20-month-old sister, Georgia, to the event “to show support” for the leadership of the Episcopal Church. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergShe drew loud applause and a standing ovation as she concluded her sermon by saying that Jesus already was in charge of the gate, “and the word is out: ‘Y’all come! Come to the feast!’”The full text of her sermon is here.Later in the meeting, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, told the gathering that “the House of Deputies and the entire church are covering you with prayer as you renew, reorganize, reorder, refresh, reconstitute and, indeed, resurrect the Episcopal Church in South Carolina.”Jennings suggested to participants: “When it may seem as if the great breadth of conviction, experience and practice among Episcopalians threatens to overwhelm your longing for unity and clarity,” remember the Jan. 26 gathering and “the communion of saints that has gone before you.”“I hope you will be convinced, as I am, that our Anglican comprehensiveness is our particular gift from God and a great blessing for the Episcopal Church in South Carolina,” she said. “Follow the Anglican middle way, and it will guide you between extremes in the company of Christians from all walks of life and all gifts of the Spirit.”The full text of her remarks is here.The day’s businessLay and clergy delegates from nine parishes, 10 missions and eight “continuing parishes” were seated for the meeting. The term “continuing parishes” refers to congregations in which some but not all members have followed Bishop Mark Lawrence out of the Episcopal Church. Also among the more than 600 registrants were members of four “worshipping communities” that are in the process of organizing, as well as members of other congregations that are discerning whether to remain in the Episcopal Church.A sign outside Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, featuring the newly adopted name of the continuing Episcopalians in that part of the state reflects a prohibition against the group using the diocesan seal. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergJefferts Schori declared a quorum, and the meeting’s first order of business was to act with what attorney Thomas Tisdale called “an abundance of caution, and with the desire to comply” with a Jan. 23 temporary restraining order that prevented the group from using the diocesan seal and the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” “The Diocese of South Carolina” and “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.”The group agreed to use the name “the Episcopal Church in South Carolina” in place of what Tisdale, later elected chancellor, called “what we believe is our true and lawful name.”A hearing is set for Feb. 1 on South Carolina Circuit Court Judge Diane S. Goodstein’s order preventing any “individual, organization, association or entity” from using registered names and marks that are claimed by Lawrence and 24 other leaders associated with him. More information about the lawsuit is here.The delegates at Grace Church chose by acclamation retired Diocese of East Tennessee Bishop Charles vonRosenberg to be their bishop provisional. Jefferts Schori installed vonRosenberg during the meeting and turned over the running of the meeting to him.A bishop provisional has all the authority and responsibilities of a diocesan bishop but typically serves for a set period of time and is meant to be a bridge into the time when the diocese is ready to elect a diocesan bishop or make other decisions about its future.The Episcopalians needed a new episcopal leader because Jefferts Schori said Dec. 5 that Lawrence had renounced his orders. She and her Council of Advice agreed that, in a Nov. 17 speech to a special diocesan convention, Lawrence said the diocese had left the Episcopal Church a month earlier on Oct. 17 when she restricted his ministry after the church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops had certified to her that he had abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.”The day the board’s decision was announced, the diocesan Standing Committee said that the action “triggered two pre-existing corporate resolutions of the diocese, which simultaneously disaffiliated the diocese from the Episcopal Church and called a special convention.” Lawrence asked for and received affirmation from those at the Nov. 17 gathering of that departure.Thus the remaining Episcopalians needed a new bishop and a slate of lay and clergy leaders, which also was elected on Jan. 26.VonRosenberg, 65, has long ties to South Carolina. He and his wife, Annie, already live in the Daniel Island community of Charleston, where he retired in 2011 after serving for 12 years as bishop of East Tennessee. Since October, he has served, along with retired Bishop John Buchanan, on a voluntary basis as adviser to the steering committee that formed in October.“Here we are, a group of people committed to the Episcopal Church, some sadly displaced from their spiritual homes, others finding new life in exciting times – and a bishop who thought he had retired,” vonRosenberg told the gathering. “Here we are facing an uncertain future and relying on others for strength and support, and depending on God’s grace for the tomorrows that await.”He urged rebuilding the Episcopal Church in South Carolina upon the foundation of what he called the “Christly virtues” of humility and love, beginning with seeking forgiveness “for our failure to achieve Christian unity in our times.”VonRosenburg told the participants that, “as followers of Jesus Christ, we need to recognize that other sincere Christians – former Episcopalians – have chosen a path different from ours. Theirs is a path committed to Jesus as they understand that faith.”The full text of vonRosenberg’s address to the meeting is here.At a later press conference, the bishop suggested that healing could begin when, instead of talking over each other’s heads, people began to find hope in their previous relationships.“My hope,” he said, “is that as people realize that the ones who are perhaps on a different side at this time are not demonic, [that they] are not unchristian but have chosen a different way.”The bishop said “as we come to that point and confront each other as people, that’s where our hope lies and where, I believe, reconciliation begins.”The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, talks with two women Jan. 25 during a reception at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergIndeed, not everyone who attended the Jan. 26 meeting, or the nearly 500 who attended a reception with the presiding bishop the previous evening, has decided where he or she will end up.Cheves Leland, delegate to the meeting from St. James Episcopal-Santee, told ENS that her congregation was in discernment about its affiliation. St. James is a “small congregation in a small village” whose members do not all agree about which direction to take, she said.She has often voted opposite from the congregation’s other delegate. “We say our votes are divided, but we are not,” she said.Whatever the congregation decides, the decision will affect everyone, Leland said.“We really don’t want to split and have people leave,” she said. “I believe there is a place for everybody in the church and with God.”Julie Walters, the director of children’s ministries at Grace, knows she stands in the Episcopal Church, just as her ancestors did six generations ago when they help to found Grace, she said. But she finds herself set against her Episcopal neighbors. She has been defending herself “in the grocery store and on the tennis court” against accusations by other Episcopalians who she said were “only hearing one side” of the story.“It just shocks me,” she said, adding, “I hate this fight more than anything else.”The fight, she said, is not about liturgical changes or changing interpretations of Scripture.“It’s a fight about rule breaking … we had the same fight over women” being involved in church leadership, said Walters, whose godmother was, as Walters put it, the first female “vestryman” at Grace and was a target of disagreement.Elizabeth Jones told ENS Jan. 25 that she had a simple wish for the weekend: “that this is the beginning of the healing.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rev. Paul Hartt says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books David Yarbrough says: January 29, 2013 at 8:39 pm The Presiding Bishop Likens Bishop Mark Lawrence to Adam Lanza. This was completely inappropriate, spiteful, delusional, lacking anything resembling Christian charity. Do we really have any hope for reconciliation with those who have left us with this kind of rhetoric being spouted by our Presiding Bishop? When I read the address she gave to the special convention I was ashamed of what TEC has become. My wife and I have about had it with TEC. South Carolina Hank Otto says: January 26, 2013 at 10:57 pm “Most of us don’t live in a world where one person is the ultimate decider – because, over and over again, we’ve discovered that better decisions are made when they’re made in communities with appropriate checks and balances,” Jefferts Schori said. “Power assumed by one authority figure alone is often a recipe for abuse, tyranny and corruption.”Oh, my good bishop, do you realize what you said? Theodore Nutcracker says: January 28, 2013 at 9:51 pm The so-called 4th leg rightfully should be subsumed under Reason because our reasoning stems from our experiences. Besides, a 3-legged stool does not wobble as would a 4-legged stool. It was non-Anglican writing in the NYT that presumed to add a a4th leg. Grant Carson says: Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA John M Stevenson says: Margaret Carpenter says: Press Release Service January 31, 2013 at 1:48 pm For all of us, the wide end of the funnel leads to the “narrow gate.” Thank God that “with God all things are possible.” Thank God for the Cross. “Indiscriminate Inclusivity” as practiced in TEC simply makes light of the eye of the needle for us all. January 29, 2013 at 10:54 am re:”duped or co-opted” … Certainly not those in attendance at Grace Episcopal on January 26th. Ronald J. Caldwell says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR jackie adams says: John M Stevenson says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Alex Gossett Shifflet says: January 30, 2013 at 10:48 pm I do not think I will go see the movie Lincoln for two reasons. I don’t particularly like him and I don’t think Hollywood is a great portrayer of reality. That having been said I think that you are right in that the situation is a good analogy to provoke introspection. Somehow I think this will become a “posting debate” but I really am hoping that will give pause for thoughtful perspective.What would have happened if Lincoln had lived. There are widely divergent opinions. All pi in the sky because he didn’t. All we can know is what he did when he was alive. He did a lot of very bad things. Out if it a good arose which was the termination of the institution of slavery.Lincoln basically said might makes right. To win the war he said I shall suspend the constitutional writ of have as corpus without congressional authority which I have no right to do. I shall remove and imprison for the duration of the war any Maryland politician who does not agree with me and they shall have no recourse because I have illegally suspended the right of habits corpus. Now that the US Sup Ct is calling me out on the things, I shall issue an arrest warrant for the Chief Justice. It matters not that there is not one shred of legal authority which I can present to hold the south in violation of US law or the Constitution because might makes right and I have the army behind me. Not only shall I disenfranchise an Ohio politician who wants to promote peace with the south, but I shall toss him across the Mason Dixon line into the Confederacy and strip him of his citizenship like a medieval king while grossly abandoning my inaugural oath to DEFEND the Constitution. I am a convicted abolitionist but I shall abolish slavery even though the constitution at that time guaranteed it and gave me no authority to do so BUT I will only abolish it in the South and not in Maryland and Deleware. Of course later on I will go ahead and violate those two loyal states rights by proclamation no need to change that portion of the constitution that guaranteed it. Now I have to figure out what to do with these emancipated slaves. I don’t want them loitering around and even I the great abolitionist do not see them fit for positions of equality ….. So we shall pack them off to British Honduras. What do you mean her majesty is not thrilled with the idea. Don’t think I won’t pop her in the pokey and keep in mind that when she gets there she will stay there because I am the only president in history to ever unlawfully suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Yes George Bush did it but he was just a me wannabe. He wimped out and got congressional approval making it legalThese are facts. Might makes right. Even though I am a southerner I concede he did well for his side. The cost – he sold his soul to the devil. The only thing that makes us Americans as a nation is the constitution. It is a human good to which all citizens can gladly accede because of its protections. The worst presidential transgressors against it, with Franklin D and W trying to compete for second was Lincoln.All perhaps good in a war. Not too much what you want in the church. We inn SCreally believe rightly or wrongly that the presiding bishop is the Lincoln you reference. We are preparing to repel boarders. Lincoln is what we expect to come at us. We will not roll over. The strange thing is that while we are done with 815 we would really prefer to part amicably.I know there is good in Lawrence and you are wrong about him. Perhaps we are wrong about the presiding bishop. Personally I would love to see them prove us all wrong and reach an accord. Union is gone. Pax among ourselves is there for the taking. It will not be found in a court of law. Trust me. I am a lawyer! January 28, 2013 at 10:42 pm Scott,There is no doubt in any Christian’s mind about Christ alone is the Judge in the Judgment Day and He would separate the Sheep and the Goat (Matthew 13: 31-46), the Wheat and the Tares (Matthew 13: 24-30).The role of the Church (Body of Christ) is to prepare its sheep like us to grow healthy spiritually providing godly nourishment, so to face the Judge at Judgment Day. The question that separate both schools of thought (so called “Traditional” and “Liberal”) whether homosexuality is healthy nourishment help develop spiritual growth that comes from God or toxic food from evil, forbidden to consume since beginning of creation like forbidden fruit in Eden Garden. Only the Holy Bible could provide the answer not the Science or present culture of a society. It is matter of life and death situation of human souls in eternity, rely heavily on Church teaching on virtue and vice. And Science has little knowledge or no knowledge about souls of human and God. Choice is ours accepting or rejecting new idea initiated based on personal experience on homosexuality, which never happened before. But dispute still could amicably be settled with the light of Christian environment to glorify God as both parties acknowledge Jesus Christ is Son of God and abstaining abusing each other. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab January 28, 2013 at 9:03 pm Ooh, such umbrage. My apologies if I touched a nerve. walter combs says: January 29, 2013 at 11:31 am Again … well said, Mr. Caldwell. January 27, 2013 at 7:10 pm With all due respect to those who have chosen to leave The Episcopal Church, I truly do not understand how one can claim that the Diocese that changed their Constitution and Canons to eliminate The Episcopal Church, in violation of Mark Lawrence’ holy vows to uphold The Episcopal Church, can claim to continue to be The Episcopal Diocese of SC. We are not a new entity, but a group of Episcopalians continuing to uphold the Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church. I understand disagreeing with The Episcopal Church but I don’t understand how people can leave and then feel betrayed by those of us who choose to stay. I pray for all of us every day that God will help us regain our Christian Unity. God’s Peace. January 28, 2013 at 10:04 pm It wasn’t Saul’s intent to become St. Paul. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Dave Thomas says: Jane McFaddin says: Daniel New says: January 29, 2013 at 10:32 am You commented that Bishop Lawrence “assured our Bishop that it was not his intent lead the EDSC out of ECUSA” to which my followup comment was to point out that intentions, at times, change with circumstance. I have no doubt that +Lawrence was sincere in his stated position at the time of the second round of approvals.If anyone has been “duped or co-opted” it is most certainly not the members of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.The reference to Saul was to point to a church leader who definitely changed with circumstances (Damascus Road). January 28, 2013 at 11:44 pm Please, if your conscience says you cannot stay. Leave in Peace and don’t steal the assets of the larger body you willingly gave. GodSpeed but don’t take what belongs to the larger church body. This Southern ‘break the union’ and narrowly interpret the word of God is sad in the 21st Century. January 28, 2013 at 5:38 pm Go see the movie, “Lincoln.” He steadfastly refused to accept that the South had in fact created a separate nation, rather people in the South were in a rebellion that should be ended so that the legitimate governments of the states could be reformed as part of the Union. I don’t recall that the Southern States agreed with that interpretation or appreciated Lincoln’s efforts to maintain the Union. The view of schismatics toward our Presiding Bishop remind me of that period of history. I don’t know how you can be the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina if you are not part of the Episcopal Church or have use of anything pertaining to The Protestant Episcopal Church in the USA if you have violated the Constitution and Canons of such and have disaffiliated from it. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 John M Stevenson says: Bryan Hunter says: Hank Otto says: Rector Belleville, IL John M Stevenson says: Julian Malakar says: January 30, 2013 at 9:57 pm Well I can tell there are few lawyers on this page. Mr Caldwell is correct about the legal cases. However look at the cases and you will see very deep legal variances as to why the courts decided as they did. As a SC lawyer, our approach is quite different. California has a state statue that controlled the issue. SC does not. Texas was an open field and they swung toward TEC. This is a guess and I would not wager money on it, but after watching the Texas Supreme Court arguments I think they will probably reverse. If Texas falls perhaps Virginia will too. I definitely think Virginia will wait on Texas before rendering an opinion. However the Texas oral arguments or rater court examination seemed to come directly from the SC All Saints Waccamaw case. For those not familiar with that case the SC Sup Ct shot down both diocesan trust and TEC Dennis Canon trust theories in favor of a break away parish. So I think everyone should really consider refraining from puffing up like blowfish and making such certain claims about who is or who is not. The SC Sup Ct will answer it in due time unless the parties back off and start COMPROMISING on legal issues. Both sides can do that honorably without compromising an ounce on theology. Hank Otto says: January 29, 2013 at 8:35 pm John Stevenson:The Presiding Bishop Likens Bishop Mark Lawrence to Adam Lanza. This was completely inappropriate, spiteful, delusional, lacking anything resembling Christian charity. Do we really have any hope for reconciliation with those who have left us with this kind of rhetoric being spouted by our Presiding Bishop? When I read the address she gave to the special convention I was ashamed of what TEC has become. My wife and I have about had it with TEC. Chris Walchesky says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 29, 2013 at 1:31 pm When I hear people on either side of this drama citing “ordination vows” forgive me but as a Non Episcopalian I can’t help but ask “are you seriously bringing up ordination vows” when you have bishops as well as priests rejecting the historic Creeds, the Incarnation, the Divinity of Christ , the uniqueness of Scriptures and Holy Tradition with impunity but yet if some people, clergy and bishops decide to leave you accuse them of “violating their ordination vows”! Really! So help me understand this for it appears you can be an agnostic, a New Age devotee, a deist like your PB, reject the doctrine of the Divinity of Jesus and the Trinity and that is not a violation but if you leave and wont to keep what you have paid for with your own money and sweat you are violating your vows! If this a correct reading of what constitutes nullification of vows then is it not therefore correct to assume that there is no longer any “core doctrine” of the Episcopal Church except what is relative to the particular bishop, priest or deacon?Regardless of what ultimately happens, and I would not count my chickens before they hatch if I were PECUSA, the spectacle unfolding in South Carolina is very bad press for Episcopalians of whatever “jurisdiction”. What it is saying to people who have little or no regard for religion is that religious people are the worst kinds of people and for those who are people of faith it is saying money and property is more important than belief and practice. January 28, 2013 at 1:47 pm “Love and hope”? You mean like when the presiding bishop likened those of us who made the difficult decision to walk apart from TEC to the school shooter and to homicidal terrorists? I’ve heard of “tough love” before, but I think describing the presiding bishop’s words as loving tortures all logic. To his credit, Bishop vonRosenberg sounds conciliatory and seems to be holding out the olive branch. It remains to be seen, but if it were left up to him and Mark Lawrence, I think an amicable parting of ways could be possible, but judging from her past actions, the presiding bishop will have none of that, and her words on Saturday certainly offer no “hope” that she will act in differently towards South Carolina than she has anywhere else. Of course, the vonRosenbergs live here, side beside with Mark Lawrence and those who remained in the Diocese of South Carolina. The presiding bishop doesn’t. Very poor taste for her to come down from New York, stir up the ant hill, and then leave it to those of us who live here to clean up the resultant mess. Remember the day when, if nothing else, Episcopalians at least had good manners? Bad form, Bishop Jefferts Schori. January 27, 2013 at 2:31 pm I am amazed at the pictures – the church looks empty. According to the story above, it appears that they had less than 100 delegates and only 8 churches out of over 70 (in the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina). From the press I was reading I thought this was some big deal and all these churches would show up and support the restart. There must be more to the story than the press is reporting. John M Stevenson says: January 28, 2013 at 1:53 pm No, she doesn’t, Ms Carpenter. With all due respect, Carol is spot-on.I wish the forming diocese currently operating as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina all the best. I assume in the future the provisional diocese will follow the Constitution and Canons of TEC and actually officially form the diocese according to the organization’s own set procedures. It will be interesting to see what permanent name is chosen for the new diocese once this is done. January 30, 2013 at 11:14 am So true, Paul. The problem arises when those invited to the table try to turn the table into their own. They leave out that problematic “turning from one’s unregenerate ways”. John M Stevenson says: John M Stevenson says: January 27, 2013 at 7:30 pm Amen! Bryan Hunter says: January 28, 2013 at 6:18 pm Having watched this situation unfold for nearly 20 years, I marvel at how well Bp Lawrence managed to isolate people in the diocese from any outside information, discussions, data, etc. (Note that the same pattern was followed in Pittsburg, Ft. Worth, San Juaquin, Quincy, etc.) This mess began with Fitz Allison who persuaded Kendall Harmon that John Calvin had not completed the reformation and it was Kendall’s work to now finish it.Aside from all of that, I have always been appalled at the rudeness of male clergy from the first point the Presiding Bishop made her first visit to SC. The audio recordings make me ashamed of my southern brothers who I know were taught better manners by their mothers. Whether you like the guest in your home or not, ordinary manners dictate that you be polite to the guest at a minimum. It has been a southern tradition that women were treated with a great deal of respect. My own mother would have swatted me hard if I didn’t behave accordingly. The mothers of the boys at that first meeting would be ashamed of their sons.Despite what you may hear, the Diocese of SC did not/does not/can not leave The Episcopal Church. The General Convention is the source of authority and only it can allow a diocese to leave the Episcopal Church (olr join in the case of new dioceses). And despite what you hear the teachings of the Episcopal Church are not deviations from either Scripture or what was allegedly handed down by the Apostles. Scripture has ALWAYS been subject to interpretation. One need only read the passage from Nehemia that was yesterday’s OT lesson. It even uses the words “interpret” with regard to the law of Moses and in the context of culture and larger narrative. Anyone who really thinks we have not been interpretting Scripture in the light of tradition, reason and culture is very much in denial of reality.Mark Lawrence et al have one interest: making sure that what they call their diocese is in the full control of white males, middle aged and older and presumably straight. They just cannot grasp the concept that the world or the church is no longer run by straight white men. Look at who makes up the clergy in the break away group. How many are of color? How many are female priests? (There are female deacons I believe but they are at the authority of their bishop and generally do as told.)This is a game begun decades ago. Unfortunately my dear friend Ed Salmon had a chance to bring sanity to the situation but either could not or chose not to do so. We all pay the consequences of Fitz Allisons fantasies and what he has wrought.As always, I will keep a seat at the table for all, even those who think they have left The Episcopal Church. They are my sisters and brothers in Christ. Unfortunately, the same is not reciprocated.Judgment has always belonged to God and God alone. I will let God tell me when I stand before the throne of grace whether or not I have been a good servant. As best as I have been able I have followed God’s primary commandment: Love God and love my neighbor as myself. There were no exceptions to those who I am to love….even if I would like there to be!Bruce GarnerL5 AtlantaFormer Member, Executive Council Hank Otto says: Tags January 28, 2013 at 3:20 pm The PB is losing her grip on reality. Calling Bishop Lawrence a tyrant and comparing his actions to terriorism is over the top. Maybe she forgot to take her meds. Daniel New says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ January 26, 2013 at 10:45 pm Charleston is actually called the holy city not because of religious tolerance but because in the old city you can see a steeple from wherever you stand. In early times we were perhaps running second only to the Plymouth Colony in intolerance. Perhaps we surpaased it in our 1705 Church Acts which made the Anglican Church the official church of the Colony. It was pretty strict. If you were not married in an Anglican Church, your children were declared bastards.Lets pray that an ambassador without portfolio starts to circulate between Lawrence and von Rosenberg and an equitable solution can be reached without the financial, spiritual and emotional warfare that is in the making nowOther than that, good article. Good reporting. Great factual data. Little spin. You don’t often see that in the press anymore. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 26, 2013 January 28, 2013 at 12:09 pm I think you have this backwards, Carol. January 29, 2013 at 11:51 pm So true, Ronald. It is written in the Bible that Jesus invited the disciples to a gay bar and demanded that his disciples lay down and party with the ones there. I am sure it is written! January 27, 2013 at 8:34 am ‘“Somebody decides he knows the law and oversteps whatever authority he may have to dictate the fate of others who may in fact be obeying the law – and often a law for which this local tyrant is not the judge,” she said.’Tyrant: ‘an absolute ruler unrestrained by law or constitution, [one] who exercises absolute power oppressively or brutally [and] an oppressive ruler in the harsh use of authority or power.’Bishop Lawrence and the standing committee have acted according to, and entirely within, the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Diocese and the civil corporation laws of South Carolina. The person making the comments in the referenced quote above habitually act without the Constitution and Canons of The PECUSA; makes up the rules as she sees fit.Therefore, who is the tyrant? walter combs says: January 28, 2013 at 8:39 pm It was Mr. Lawrence et al who instigated suit against TEC, not the other way round as your statement suggests. If you are sued, you must respond. However, I agree with your question in one sense….. I wonder where all of this money is coming from that Mr. Lawrence et al are using for litigation? Being a South Carolinian and looking at the names of some of the law firms involved with Mr. Lawrence’s suit, all I can say is that I hope those who have decided to leave TEC and file suit against TEC have either VERY deep pockets or VERY wealthy benefactors. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 29, 2013 at 3:51 pm Our Lord said to go and sin no more, not continue in sin and it’s fine. He also spoke on the subject of marriage and the Truth of the Bible. John M Stevenson says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis January 28, 2013 at 11:17 pm The article above is good but does not quite convey the atmosphere of the convention. I attended. It was a grand and glorious celebration of new life, Easter on steroids. The building was packed to overflowing (into the courtyard) for a magnificent Eucharist and diocesan special convention. The entire meeting was upbeat, optimistic, positive. The whole congregation (except Lawrence’s spy) burst forth in unbridled enthusiasm in loud, joyous demonstratrions again and again, for the great Presiding Bishop, for the bishop provisional, and most of all for the vote to restore all ties to the Episcopal Church. The man next to me leaned over and said “We are Episcopal again!” I could not answer for the lump in my throat. Many a tear of joy was shed on smiling faces throughout that wonderful and historic day. Although the unchristian ambush by the Lawrence party through the Dorchester court kept the convention from using its actual names and emblems, the clear implication in all of the convention’s work was that this was the continuing Episcopal church diocese of South Carolina. The overwhelming joy, happiness, enthusiasm, and friendliness of that day will remain with me for years to come. To those who think the Episcopal Church in the low country is dead or will shrivel into nothingness, I say look again. The Episcopal Church is very much alive and well in its ongling diocese of South Carolina through the lives of thousands of devoted and loyal Episcopalians who have incorporated compassion, justice, and mercy in their lives and are proud to make their stand for indiscriminate inclusivity. January 28, 2013 at 7:32 pm As a journalist who has written both for Episcopal News Service and the Episcopal Journal about events in South Carolina for the past several years, and as a priest who was for almost a dozen years Secretary of Convention in the Diocese of North Carolina, I have followed this on-going saga closely.I have one technical question that I wish someone could answer. Regarding the convention held this past weekend in Charleston, it seems to me impossible that the continuing Episcopalians could have had a canonical quorum of either lay delegates or clergy. I read in the ENS story that the Presiding Bishop “declared” that there was a quorum. What was the basis of that declaration? If those desiring to remain in the national Episcopal Church do not admit that the parishes and clergy committed to Lawrence have left the church, then those parishes and clergy must be included in the number needed for a quorum. It can’t be both ways. A true quorum would have to be a majority of all parishes and all clergy in the diocese. Without a quorum, no official acts can be taken, or legislation enacted, bishops elected, or canons or bylaws revised. I assume that the Presiding Biship cannot simply make up canon law on the spot. In my diocese, the number of duly elected lay delegates and clergy present at this weekend’s Charleston meeting would have been clearly insufficient to conduct business, and insufficient to represent the will of the diocese as a whole. Can anyone out there enlighten me on this? January 28, 2013 at 6:46 pm Out of curiosity, now that the EDSC has “disaffiliated” from ECUSA, what will you be using as BCP and Hymnal? Baptismal vows? Catecheses for the young? Training for those to be confirmed? Other forms of formation? Everything else appears to have been intentionally thought out and acted upon in during the past ten years (+/-). Just how absolute is this “disafiliation”? Are not these worth asking about? Chris Walchesky says: January 30, 2013 at 12:07 pm Walter Combs: Please re-read what she had to say without preconceived notion or bias, and be kindly. Ronald J. Caldwell says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Nicholas Forde says: January 27, 2013 at 9:50 am Pot meet Kettle. John M Stevenson says: Marc Kivel says: Bryan Hunter says: John M Stevenson says: Daniel New says: John M Stevenson says: Hank Otto says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Scott Turner says: Julian Malakar says: Bruce Garner says: Julian Malakar says: January 28, 2013 at 5:36 pm Calling the Presiding Bishop a tyrant ignores the fact that multiple committees and commissions had a hand in this saga. the PB’s Council of Advice concurred with her actions. The Title IV Board of Review delivered its findings. The PB has next to no power on her own–she is empowered by the consent of the bodies that are canonically empowered to do so. If she were really a tyrant, her life would be a lot easier–she could have just removed Lawrence, Bennison, and other troublesome bishops years ago and saved herself the aggravation.The situation also ignores the fact that the EPISCOPAL Diocese of South Carolina fully and unreservedly assented to the Constitution and Canons of the The Episcopal Church at TEC’s founding, and repeatedly thereafter, even after the “Dennis canon” was passed. To then vote to disaffiliate is like a McDonalds franchise saying “we aren’t going to follow the rules of McDonalds, we’re not going to pay them any money, but we’re going to keep the name, the logo, and all that goes with it. Oh, and we’re the REAL McDonalds!” It might also be likened to South Carolina refusing to follow any federal laws (taxation, etc…) but still referring to itself as a state. You cannot have a diocese independent of a national church body. That’s now now the system works. Sorry folks. If you are within The Episcopal Church, then you are subject to its rules. If you are not, leave the keys on the table and go, but don’t think you can have it both ways.I also don’t agree with calling Bishop Lawrence a tyrant and comparing his actions to terrorism, but we now have a church system that is highly anxious and reactive–and few are thinking clearly or speaking thoughtfully. January 29, 2013 at 9:26 pm Point of clarification historically and very briefly. No one has been able to pinpoint exactly why Charleston became known as the Holy City. There are numerous theories.Early Carolina was actually tolerant of various denominations and religions, except, early on, members of the Catholic Church. Hank’s comment about marriage and bastards must refer to the political differences between the English and French in Carolina before 1700, but naturalization as Englishmen was at issue, not religious beliefs. The Church Act set up the parish system in the colony, bu did not ban any other denominations or religions (except that Catholics were still not welcomed until much later). The Congregationalists, Anabaptists, French Protestants and others all had churches and Jewish settlers were free to worship, although they could not hold office or vote openly. January 29, 2013 at 7:39 pm Bishop Gentry, to which denomination do you belong ? January 29, 2013 at 8:44 am Well said, M. Caldwell. January 28, 2013 at 2:02 pm “God’s feast doesn’t need ‘keep-out’ signs,” Jefferts Schori said: “The banquet table is spread with abundance for all, even though it’s hard to join the feast if you’re busy controlling the gate.” she concluded her sermon by saying that Jesus already was in charge of the gate, “and the word is out: ‘Y’all come! Come to the feast!’”We all know that present crisis arises from the question which group is following principle of Gospel, Christ ministered being God incarnated, two thousand year before.Sermon stated above by PB indicating heaven’s gate is wide open for all, no restriction implied, where as we find in the Gospel parable, given by Jesus Christ referring nature of Kingdom of Heaven, that in a wedding banquet, when invited special guests were unable to attend banquet for personal business, King invited everybody to fill up banquet table. But later King was surprised to find that some people came even without proper dress (moral code). Angrily King throw undressed people into hell (Matthew 22: 1-14). We know from Jesus’ teaching Heaven’s gate is actually narrow not wide open as preached, like wheat field weeds are taken out from the field to allow wheat plant grow healthy and produce abundance yield. In the parable we learnt many are invited but few are chosen. In PB’s sermon lacks important cautionary note for Kingdom of Heaven, we all looking for and invest our busy time going to Church. Christianity is passing thru a difficult time with modern ideology contrary to principle of Church teachings, bottom line: United we stand, divided we fall. Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (129) Rector Albany, NY John M Stevenson says: January 29, 2013 at 2:32 pm In my understanding of the Gospels, Our Lord was the great champion of indiscriminate inclusivity. He reached out to everyone from the lowest dregs, the lepers who were grateful, to the highest, the prince who turned away. I cannot think of a single example of when he excluded anyone (even Judas). Indeed, his followers tended to be the ones shunned, cast out, marginalized, maligned, discriminated against. And can anyone cite one word Jesus ever said about homosexuality? In my view, Jesus was the very personification of God’s love and mercy for everyone, no one excluded. Rector Bath, NC January 28, 2013 at 9:27 pm Bruce Garner wrote: “Anyone who really thinks we have not been interpretting Scripture in the light of tradition, reason and culture is very much in denial of reality.”The original “legs” of the church were Scripture, reason and tradition. “experience” was added as a 4th leg, but experience can warp badly. If someone was abused by their father, calling God “Father” might be inconceivable. What is needed is NOT renaming God, but healing for that person. Is it easily achieved? No. Is it worth working for? Yes. Scott Turner says: center_img Rev. Paul Hartt says: January 28, 2013 at 11:09 am Former bishop Lawrence and his standing committee have acted according to, and entirely within, the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Diocese as they have rewritten them. There are and will be issues of disagreement among members of a large group. The question is, must these disagreements lead to a schism? Either you work together in spite of your differences, or it’s “my way or no way”, which seems to be what’s happening here. January 28, 2013 at 9:51 pm Those who have left The Episcopal Church should take on the name The Episcopal Church of Mark Lawrence. And the clergy who have left either lied (perhaps with their fingers crossed behind their backs) or were non compos mentis because at their ordination they were asked, “Will you be loyal to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of Christ as this Church has received them? And will you, in accordance with the canons of this Church, obey your bishop and other ministers who may have authority over you and your work?” The answer includes “and I do solemnly engage to conform to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of the [Protestant] Episcopal Church[in the United States of America].” This does not mean you can then write your own rules. To use a sports analogy, it isn’t your ball field, it isn’t you bat, it isn’t your ball, and it isn’t your base. You are part of something much larger than yourself. If you don’t want to play nicely, then leave, but don’t try to take what is not yours, even when your bishop writes new rules and expect the larger community to suddenly say “What a great idea!” Writing your own rules doesn’t change the larger community’s. By the way, you who have left have often commented on TEC spending $22 million. Would you be so kind to as to tell the rest of us what the break away groups have spent? Or is that a secret you can’t/won’t reveal because it will embarrass you and your like-minded friends? Fair is fair. When you say that those who continue in The Episcopal Church that they could not afford to maintain big church buildings, you don’t seem to believe that with God, all things are possible. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Milton Finch says: Ronald J. Caldwell says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC January 27, 2013 at 8:03 pm Susan, You do not understand what happened. The Diocese of South carolina has disaffiliated from TEC which is our right to do so. Those left in TEC can NOT claim our name. That is ILLEGAL. Please choose a new name that is distinct and does not cause confusion with either diocese in the state of South Carolina.We don’t feel betrayed at all. We knew what was coming down the pike and have taken steps to remedy the confusion from those like yourselves who have tried to steal our name and identity and cause deliberate confusion. It is clear that your group is just out for a major power and property grab. Sad. TEC is all about real estate and power. I will close with our bishop’s vision for us. Making Biblical Anglicans for a Global Age. Curate Diocese of Nebraska January 31, 2013 at 3:45 pm Yes, Hank that would be nice. Unfortuinately it was PECDSC in its manic push for legitimacy that first sued in court, for everything, all the property. Of course, they said it was “preemptive” (the same thing Dubya said about Iraq and its imaginary weapons of mass destruction). Then, PECDSC went to court again and got the judge to issue an ex parte (no lawyer on the TEC side was notified ahead) surprise-attack order of Temporary Restraining Order just days before the Episcopalians were to meet. So what is TEC supposed to do, roll over and play dead? Not gonna happen. Comments navigation Newer comments John M Stevenson says: January 27, 2013 at 12:00 pm I can’t express the love and hope that I felt at the special convention yesterday at Grace Episcopal Church. The Most Reverend Katharine Jefferts Schori is such a beautiful person filled with love. Also, I welcome The Right Reverend Charles G. vonRosenberg with open arms. It is time to move forward and I’m so proud to be apart of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina!! Carol McRee says: February 1, 2013 at 12:40 am Amen, Bishop Gentry. How quickly we lose sight of the truth of what you say. Those on both “sides” (it pains me to write that) should bow in humility before the powerful truth you have written there. As a brother in Christ, I thank you. January 29, 2013 at 10:35 am This includes $24 million that Dr. Schori and her chancellor have spent in legal fees on behalf of TEC for their own “property grabs” in Fort Worth, Quincy, San Joaquin, Pittsburgh, Northern Virginia, and elsewhere, in addition to South Carolina.Dr. Schori’s two-faced behavior in dealing with Bishops Lawrence and Waldo is reprehensible and further indicative of the power issue. Rev. Paul Hartt says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Daniel New says: January 29, 2013 at 9:17 am Seems there is a lot of heat and anger and not much light or understanding. The historic properties and traditions of the past Diocese of South Carolina are just as precious and inspring to the continuing members as they are to those who are leaving. The national church would be failing in its duty if it did not do all it can to retain them for future genearations.As to the issues that caused the separation, ultimately they are of little importance in God’s realm. Jesus accepted and ministered to all who came to him. While he told the sinful to repent he accepted them. If we hope to grow in God’s image and grace we must do the same. You cannot hope to change those you refuse to include. Jesus commanded us to love one another and did not ask us to judge whom we will love. As a member of the upper SC diocese, I pray daily for the best outcome of this conflict and ask God to help us to discern and fulfill his will for us. Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 29, 2013 at 1:01 pm Another well-said comment. January 28, 2013 at 12:08 pm The pictures you are looking at were taken after the meet-and-greet had finished. The church at the Eucharist was filled to overflowing. People had to be seated in an adjacent room to watch on a close circuit TV. In the church we were joyfully squashed together. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC January 30, 2013 at 2:05 pm Mr Neir I was ordained deacon and priest in the Eastern Church. I was ordained bishop for an Intentional Eucharistic Community and am now retired. The IEC movement is a result of former Roman Catholics attempting to live and practice the reforms of Vatican II and later as an ecumenical community. There are several thousands IECs here and in Europe. Bishop Andrew Gerales Gentry says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 29, 2013 at 1:08 pm “That is the larger issue at stake here, whether to minister to societal changes (TEC) or condemn them (PSCDSC). I know on which side I stand, proudly for indiscriminate inclusivity.”“Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.” (Mt. 7: 13.)Don’t you think the Gospel of our Lord Jesus is a little more demanding than “indiscriminate inclusivity”? Margaret Carpenter says: January 28, 2013 at 8:18 pm January 28, 2013 at 6:39 pm Obviously rewritten to suit one’s ends rather than live by them. Cyndee Lowe says: February 1, 2013 at 6:42 pm Ok I can see your point as a layman. As a lawyer it means something different to me. A TRO and an injunction are merely tools to hold things in place during litigation and have no real impact on the final outcome. It is not a bad idea in this case. There is nothing significant about the TRO being ex parte. Almost all TROs are ex parte. That is why SCRCP 65 mandates a hearing on it within 10 days so the other side gets due process of law. I have obtained TROs and I am sure Tom Tisdale has too. Not a big deal and I discourage people on our side from making a big deal of it because it has nothing to do with the merits.Secondly whether we are right or not we claim the name and seal of the Diocese. There was no secret that the TEC people were using the seal and planning to reorganize. Past practice across the county also told us that immediately following they were going to hit us with a suit. If you were on our side strategically, holding the positions that we do, would you wait quietly in the corner for bombs to start falling?I don’t expect TEC to roll over. None of us expect TEC to alter its approach to property disputes. It is not a manic push for legitimacy. It really is preemptive.I understand why there is a lot of emotion in your posts. I share it on the other side but have to choke it back very frequently. A lot is at stake. The point I am making is that it does not have to be an all or nothing and BOTH sides need to realize it.So here is my question. Does it hurt the MISSION of either church to have the majority of each congregation decide whether to go with the side they elect. Certainly that will have more going with Bishop Lawrence than TEC. But if we can get past that do you think we can worship in peace and not interfere with one another. Of course TEC will have a Diocese in SC. So will we. If we can strike accord on the essential issues then the name issue which is wiggling everyone out will almost de facto work itself out January 29, 2013 at 5:39 pm Ronald,There must be exclusivity in accepting one over other as long there is two spiritual power working over our day to day life constantly “Good” and “Evil”. In the rule of law, court reject one party over other who does not comply with existing law and existing law varies with time and space. But God Almighty is unchanged with time and space, because He does not spin around anything like we do, earth moves around the sun and we have years and different seasons. God does not have years. There is no “Traditional/Liberal” in the eyes of God. God says that we are either with Him or against Him and we cannot serve two masters.In the context of homosexuality, many emphasized the word “inclusive” for the sake of validating of new idea. But they forget that all Christian believe like TEC, that God’s abundance love (not sexual) for forgiveness of our sins is inclusive, all human are invited to His banquet table with thankful (repentance) mind accepting Jesus Christ as Son of God and loving God and neighbor with righteous works. Any question about righteousness of God, we should consult the Bible with faith, prayer, reasoning and personal experience in relationship to God. Unfortunately no one asked Jesus when He was ministering, whether or not same sex marriage is sinful when He answered purpose and righteousness of heterosexual marriage, selection of mate and God’s blessing for family. In other word, people of Jesus time knew the answer reading scripture story about Sodom and Gomorra and Jesus did not talk about it.But despite new innovation about God’s love for forbidden sexuality known for years, still I am confident, we could get answer from God in this turmoil situation in the light of Jesus Christ, whose birth day we celebrated little over one month and read about PB’s Christmas message about the light, to settle the property issue in the spirit of fellowship under one God. To spread the gospel, both parties agree, need property and they were “One Body” before this new innovation. God’s settlement is win-win and court’s settlement is win-loss, costs money and time as Mr. Ronald said well above. Christ’s peace in all understanding be for both the Church. Bryan Hunter says: February 1, 2013 at 12:33 am Mr Caldwell, I don’t intend to be uncharitable, but most of what you’ve written on this thread is pure rubbish. The Diocese of South Carolina sought a declaratory judgement from the Circuit Court of South Carolina. It does not seek any monetary damages, compensatory damages, punitive damages, etc. All it seeks is for the South Carolina Court to affirm its rightful claim to the corporate identity that it lawfully registered in the state of South Carolina and the property that it, and the parishes within it, legally own. I’m very sorry for you that the facts of the case do not match your personal expectations, which I can see is quite disappointing, but the decent thing to do is to be a gentleman about it by accepting the fact that legally the Diocese of South Carolina under Bishop Mark Lawrence is in the right and TEC is not. It doesn’t make you less of a person. But you do risk diminishing yourself by being dishonest about the facts. January 27, 2013 at 12:08 pm If Rt. Revd. Mark Lawrence is a tyrant, how come he allows these schismatics to leave his diocese, and keep their properties. Those who stay with the true historical diocese have done so without any threats or coercion, whilst the PB continued a vindictive campaign of litigation. She is the one who appears to have an idiosyncratic interpretation of the Constitution and Canons. January 30, 2013 at 10:55 am I believe there is a confusion in this view of the beginning with the end. Too many in TEC misunderstand “indiscriminate inclusivity” as the end of the Gospel rather than the means into and beginning of the Gospel. Steven Long says: February 1, 2013 at 6:17 pm It’s hard to disagree with Chevis on historic matters in SC. So I shall stand corrected. John Neir says: January 29, 2013 at 10:31 am It’s interesting to note your blurring of distinctions between the Standing Committee, Diocesan Convention, and Bishop Lawrence.Mark Lawrence didn’t singlehandedly change anything. The standing committee – elected representatives of the Diocese – made these changes. The Diocese in convention called Mark Lawrence to the episcopate – TWICE – knowing his integrity and where he stood. My point is that, while Bishop Lawrence is the chief operating officer, the Standing Committee and Diocesan Convention are at least coequal as agents of change.And I note that Bishop Lawrence’s ordination vows include the promise to “boldly proclaim and interpret the Gospel of Christ”, and the promise to guard faith as well as unity.While you may be “a group of Episcopalians continuing to uphold the Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church” as you perceive them, you are clearly in the minority among Christians in the Anglican tradition in South Carolina. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Susan Kearney says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ronald J. Caldwell says: January 29, 2013 at 12:26 pm John M Stevenson says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI January 28, 2013 at 6:01 pm The current Episcopal Church in South Carolina will be known by it’s rightful name (The Diocese of South Carolina) once the dust clears from the lawsuits. Just because the former bishop of SC and some of his followers have left and taken things with them on their way out certainly doesn’t mean the courts won’t give it all back to the rightful owners in the end. The schismatics property-grab is perfect evidence that it was all about power and money to begin with. It’s just a shame that both sides are going to end up spending huge sums of money on this disagreement. I would hope that representatives of both sides could sit down and work something out to benefit all concerned, but I really can’t see former bishop Lawrence and his followers giving an inch until forced by the courts (blowing millions of other people’s money in the process). January 28, 2013 at 8:09 pm And what precisely, Mr. Stevenson, prevents an Episcopal diocese from rewriting their constitution and canons? Please cite your source for such a prohibition.As for living by ones by-laws, you may wish to study the C&Cs of General Convention and understand how many either ignore or misinterpret them to suit their own situation. David Yarbrough says: Submit an Event Listing January 28, 2013 at 9:45 pm Forgot to mention that as a member of a Standing Committee, I (one of seven out of 12) voted to consent to give Lawrence a chance the second go-round in 2007 after he assured our Bishop that it was not his intent lead the EDSC out of ECUSA (we all voted against the first time around, for obvious reasons). I was even an apologist on his behalf, given what he had to deal with in that Diocese (I and others here have followed your web site – source) and I continue to wonder if he was duped or co-opted. Comments are closed. January 28, 2013 at 5:15 pm Julian,Read the parable of the wheat and the tares, I believe the judgement is God’s alone. The Church should err on the side of mercy. Everytime the Church has taken God’s exclusive role of judgement into its own hands, a new period of broken witness begins. What is going on here is exactly the witness that turns the unbeliever into, well, a well-justified unbeliever. Christians who cannot stay in communion while in disagreement have defied the Lord’s prayer that we all may be one. Is disobedience corrected by schism or is schism a way to silence the influence of those who hear a different leading from the Spirit than one’s own? Moral and ecclessiastical certainty is a terminal condition for those who see now in a glass darkly. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC January 29, 2013 at 8:30 am Marked difference twixt Paul and Lawrence. Sally Rowan says: Tod Roulette says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Hank Otto says: Harriott Cheves Leland says: January 30, 2013 at 9:42 pm Ok. Lets take a step back from both sides and consider a hypothetical and this is just a hypothetical so no one read anything in to it. Suppose a bishop agrees to be bound by the constitution and canons of a hypothetical church. Then suppose that church decides that Christianity is not the way and that Islam is a better course of action. The church accordingly changes its canons and constitution to reflect the change. However the bishop is deeply convicted in Christianity as are his parishioners. Can the bishop legitimately walk away from the church and continue to minister to the remnants who also wish to be Christian? It’s ok to say no or yes or nothing at all. However whatever your answer it has implications. Those who follow Bishop Lawrence say yes. Those who back TEC may say no or may say yes under the hypothetical. If the say yes under the hypothetical then justification is a matter of degree and that is the slippery slope. If they say no then they undercut the presiding bishops comments about preserving assets for the purposes that the donors gave them for no one who knows anything about South Carolinians would ever even bother to make the argument that it would have been acceptable for any SC donor from 1685 until today to see their gifts go to a Moslem based faith. There is no easy answer. But …. It will be a hell of a lot cheaper for all of the purple people to agree to a position freeze, 40j the case and try to have a settlement that includes an accommodation for all involved in SC rather than a slash mark in the win column Hank Otto says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID F.W. Atkins says: January 28, 2013 at 9:18 pm How about Mrs. Jefferts Schori’s own words: “It’s not terribly far from the state of mind evidenced in school shootings, or in those who want to arm school children, or the terrorism that takes oil workers hostage.”I really thing the lady is unhinged. Bishop Andrew Gerales Gentry says: E. T. Malone, Jr. says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Hank Otto says: January 28, 2013 at 6:15 pm My, my … the vilification continues. Cannot anything resembling Christian charity be said by those who “disaffiliated”? Featured Jobs & Calls January 27, 2013 at 9:53 am Actually according to the Constitution and Canons of the Diocese of South Carolina, a quorum was NOT present. Just because I call the sky green doesn’t make it so.But then again, this is a new entity and not the diocese that has shepherded this land for 225+ years. The bylaws of this new Episcopal assembly in South Carolina are new as well. Earle Phillips says: January 30, 2013 at 11:14 pm I wish you all well. Among you are my friends and family. I hope you wish us well too I hope the presiding bishops message of hope for South Carolinians includes us. I hope that you are right in that we prematurely jumped the gun and entered into protective litigation ill advisedly. I fear not but really hope so. I had to leave my church because they stayed with TEC. I was not happy about it. My family was not happy about it. Majority rules. I wish them well and hope when this is over we can celebrate mass together again somehow. I found another church where the majority also ruled – overwhelmingly in favor of PEDSC. I swear I think every one of us would agree to paint the seal on every TEC church in sc if TEC would let us worship as we please without an unnecessary fight for the institutions our forebears left to us. ( and I am sure that no one in their right mind is ever going to suggest that historic South Carolinians would have given a dime in support of modern TEC positions) and if we could work that out, we sheep would be glad to call ourselves the diocese of the international house of anything but episcopalians or whatever TEC thinks is a good name for us.Probably not going to happen.I wish y’all well in your spiritual journey anyway. There is not a shred of facetiousness in that sentiment I promise you. I hope that is not mistaken to mean that we are remotely prepared to back down or flinch from the fight that is coming. But wouldn’t it be nice not to have to? Julian Malakar says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Hank Otto says: Comments navigation Newer comments January 30, 2013 at 12:00 pm “You cannot hope to change those you refuse to include.”Mr. Ken,For information to many, Christian Church refuse to include “immoral sex” such as homosexuality as virtue but not the persons, repeat not the persons, who are prisoner to urge of the body, because we all are sinner. But problem arises when TEC transformed homosexuality from vice to virtue, which Church do not have authority. Milton Finch says: Kathleen Chipps says: Tom Sramek, Jr. says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY January 29, 2013 at 6:00 pm Well I appreciate that some folks in South Carolina seem to prefer being Anglican rather than American Episcopalians – rather like their forefathers preferred to secede rather than work things out as part of the Union – I offer the thought that Mr. Lawrence was only made bishop after loudly protesting his willingness to be bound by the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Church and inasmuch as he walked away from the institution which raised him to the episcopate he is in my mind illegitimate and I question the validity of his orders and acts as he seems to be a Donatist heretic not a legitimate bishop…thoughts? January 29, 2013 at 1:09 pm Sorry admirers of Lawrence but the group that left the Episcopal Church is not the Episcopal diocese. Courts all around the country have confirmed that the Episcopal Church is an hierarchical institution entitled to manage its own affairs. The Church has a Constitution and Canons holding that a diocese cannot enter or depart from TEC without approval of General Convention. The people who voted on Nov. 17 to leave TEC did not take any diocese with them. The Episcopal diocese remained in TEC and has now been reorganized and reinvigorated with a new bishop. The titles and emblem of the diocese were protected before the Lawrenceites departed TEC. They stay with the diocese, not with the people who left the diocese. So, its the people who left TEC who will have to form a new diocese and they are free to call it whatever they wish except the titles already reserved for the Episcopal Church diocese. “Anglican Diocese of South Carolina” will probably be the name chosen as this is the pattern in the other breakaway groups. January 29, 2013 at 9:50 am … And , just to add, Paul was loyal to and supportive of the “church” in Jerusalem, irrespective of initial differences with Peter. And both Peter and Paul came to the revelation that God shows no partiality. January 30, 2013 at 11:21 pm You know there is a lot of truth in what he says. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Earle Phillips says: January 29, 2013 at 11:20 am The specific and fundamental issue at stake between the two sides here is that of sovereignty, or ultimate power. The Episcopal Church is now and has always been an hierarchical institution. It claims that it has sovereignty and that its Constitution and Canons incorporate all the dioceses. Likewise, power on the local level rests in the diocese which has authority over the local churches. This includes the Dennis Canon which holds that all local property is held in trust for the diocese and the Episcopal Church. The group calling itself the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina (PECDSC) says that it has self-sovereignty and is not subject to the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Church. Moreover, the bishop issued quit claim deeds to all local parishes relinquishing all diocesan claims to the properties.Sovereignty is one item. It cannot rest equally in two bodies. One is sovereign and the other is not.Ironically, this was the identical issue in SC before the Civil War. The state declared its right to nullify national laws, asserted its sovereignty in “states rights” and finally voted to secede from the Union as a sovereign state. The state claimed too that it predated the Union and that there was no clause in the US Constitution prohibiting secession. The issue was the same, sovereignty. The original issue of the Civil War was whether sovereignty rests in the national government or in the states. The issue at hand is the same.When a state or a diocese joins the national body it has to accept the constitution of the larger body as supreme. That is the mutual deal. The Diocese of South Carolina acceeded to the Constitution and Canons of the Episciopal Church; the Rt. Rev. Mark Lawrence swore an oath of allegiance to the Episcopal Church within his ordination as bishop. Both the diocese and the bishop accepted the sovereignty of the national body. Then, by voting to sever ties to the Episcopal Church on Nov. 17, 2012, the majority of the old diocese reneged on its obligations and declared its independence. They asserted local sovereignty over national.This issue has been before the courts around the country for many years now. One breakaway diocese case has been settled, that of Pittsburgh. The Episcopal Church prevailed. The other three are in court on appeal, but along the way produced a strong and clear ruling in Fresno on the very issue of sovereignty. Whether on the national level or the diocesan level, courts have overwhelmingly sided with the Episcopal Church.The one and only example where a local entity prevailed in a final settlement was All Saints Waccamaw where the SC Supreme Court ruled in favor of the local parish against the diocese. The PECDSC, which ironically lost the case, now pins all its hops on this very case.In the view of the Episcopal Church a diocese cannot withdraw (or join) from TEC without approval of the General Convention. Thus, the vote on Nov. 17 was illegal and the group that left did not take a diocese with them. Individuals left but the diocese did not leave. The diocese remains in the Episcopal Church. The names of the diocese apply to the Episcopal diocese and were protected when the diocese was under the C and C of the Episcopal Church. Those names and emblems belong to the diocese, not to the people who left the diocese. These will be the points the lawyers will make in court.Judge Goldstein has already shown favoritism to PECDSC and may well rule in favor of PECDSC. At any rate, whoever loses will certainly appeal the case and it will drag on for years. One may wonder why this particular court in this particular county was choden by PECDSC.Meanwhile, the two sides are busy organizing and moving forward. Bishop vonRosenberg will issue a letter to all clergy of the old diocese calling on their adherence to the Episcopal Church with 60 days to respond. Those who do not adhere will be deposed from ministry in TEC. The property issue meanwhile is in court and will likely be there for years to come.So what we have here are two very different legal views. These will go to court and be argued at length, as they have already been around the country. What will happen in SC remains to be seen. Meanwhile friends have parted, local churches broken up, extended families dissolved, and Christians are reduced to practicising what they were long ago admonished not to do, sue each other in court. It’s a sad, even scandalous state.Yet another irony is that on the issue of gender equality and rights, the country has moved on. A sea change has occurred in the last few years, as in the last election, so that numerous states and localities now allow same gender marriages and are moving toward full equality of rights for all people. Even the US military has agreed to allow women to fight in combat. The country has moved on and the Episcopal Church is trying to minister to the changes clearly going on in society. That is the larger issue at stake here, whether to minister to societal changes (TEC) or condemn them (PSCDSC). I know on which side I stand, proudly for indiscriminate inclusivity. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC February 1, 2013 at 6:50 pm I join a club. I lend them the use of my office building to meet in. I paid for the building. I keep it repaired. I pay the taxes and insurance on it. I keep the electrics on. I decide to leave the club. When I try to go to work the club tells me I cannot enter. They tell me the building is no longer mine because they voted that the property of the members automatically becomes the property of the club. Who stole the property? Was Christian charity present in the clubs actions? Rector Tampa, FL South Carolina continuing Episcopalians meet to plan their future Delegates elect leadership, change name to comply with court order Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ronald J. Caldwell says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ken Armstrong says: Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA January 28, 2013 at 8:29 pm Amen! John M Stevenson says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Dos años después de la devastación, Joplin se reconstruye

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 28, 2013 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Dos años después de la devastación, Joplin se reconstruye Los episcopales a punto de terminar un albergue para víctimas de violencia doméstica El tornado de fuerza 5 que azotó Joplin destruyó cerca de 7.000 casas y causó daños en otras 900. Foto de la Cruz Roja de Ozarks.[Episcopal News Service] Para los que viven en lo que se conoce como el Corredor de los Tornados, esta época del año es la temporada de esos fenómenos atmosféricos. En días calientes y húmedos, la gente vive con la vista puesta en el cielo, observando las nubes, y muchas comunidades han pasado por la desoladora destrucción de un tornado y han resuelto reconstruir con mayor solidez.Mientras en Moore, Oklahoma, comienzan a recoger los fragmentos después del enorme tornado del 20 de mayo, un pueblo a 362 kilómetros al norte en el [mismo] corredor está aún reponiéndose dos años después de uno de los tornados más letales en la historia de Estados Unidos.Un EF-5 (tornado de fuerza 5 en la Escala Ampliada de Fujita) deshizo a Joplin, Misurí, el 22 de mayo de 2011, con un saldo de 161 personas muertas y más de 1.000 lesionadas. En la actualidad, episcopales de todo el estado y de más lejos están ayudando a reconstruir la ciudad.En un ejemplo de ello, la iglesia episcopal de San Felipe [St. Philip’s] en Joplin, la iglesia de La Gracia [Grace] en el vecino Carthage y la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Nevada, a unos 100 kilómetros al norte, junto con las diócesis de Misurí Occidental y Misurí, han liderado el empeño de construir un albergue para que una agencia de servicio social de Joplin lo use para familias que mudan de sus hogares en situaciones de violencia doméstica y drogadicción.Esperan entregar el albergue a Lafayette House el 20 de julio.El tornado de EF-5 que azotó Joplin, Misurí, el 22 de mayo de 2011, dejó estos árboles desnudos al lado este de la secundaria del lugar, donde recogen escombros de la escuela seriamente dañada. Foto de John Daves/Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU., Distrito de Kansas City.El tornado de Joplin dañó o destruyó millares de viviendas y negocios. Una casita que Lafayette House usaba para albergar a mujeres solteras necesitadas de un hogar transicional recibió muchos daños, pero pudo ser reparado, según contó el Muy Rdo. Rev. Steve Wilson, rector de La Gracia.Sin embargo, la agencia hacía mucho tiempo que necesitaba un lugar para familias, y “resultaba muy claro que una de las inevitables secuelas sociales ‘después de un enorme desastre como éste’ era un aumento substancial de la violencia doméstica”, dijo Wilson. En consecuencia, la necesidad de tal albergue sólo podía aumentar.Además, un gran porcentaje de las viviendas destruidas por la tormenta eran propiedades en alquiler para personas de muy bajos ingresos, agregó. La gente que vivía en esas casas ya tenía dificultades. En lo que Wise llamó la atmósfera “casi frenética de una ciudad en desarrollo”, que es el Joplin actual, la propiedad para alquileres a personas de bajos ingresos no está siendo reemplazada.“La carga económica que impuso el tornado sucede que ha ido a caer sobre las personas de este pueblo que probablemente tenían menos recursos propios para enfrentarse a sus secuelas y ese es otro factor en la decisión de la diócesis de llevar a cabo este proyecto en particular”, dijo Lyon. “Era casi una certeza que las personas a quienes les prestaría servicios serían aquellas que tenían menos recursos propios que aportar que lo que otras podrían tener”.Añádale a eso el trauma psicológico y espiritual de saber que en cuestión de 20 minutos el tornado mató a 161 personas en un condado cuya población es de unos 100.000 habitantes. “Eso es un impacto masivo”, agregó Wise.El Rdo. Frank Sierra, rector de San Felipe, en Joplin, dijo que Lafayette House ha visto un aumento de clientes, de un 75 a un 85 por ciento, desde el tornado.El sitio para la nueva casa está a dos cuadras del área donde el tornado causó los daños más graves, lo que Wilson llamó “la zona de devastación”.Según una encuesta de la tormenta dada a conocer por la oficina del Servicio Meteorológico Nacional en Springfield, Misurí, el tornado, clasificado como un EF-5, viajó 35,5 kms. sobre el terreno. Su trayecto de unos 10 kilómetros dentro de la ciudad de Joplin fue, por amplio margen, el más intenso y devastador”, escribió Bill Davis, meteorólogo a cargo de la oficina de Springfield.Numerosas viviendas y negocios bien construidos fueron “barridos de sus cimientos, triturados o aplanados en el lugar, o volados por los aires y amontonados sobre otros escombros y estructuras destruidas”, dijo.Así es como se veía Rose Cottage —un hogar de transición para mujeres solteras y sus familias que escapaban de situaciones de violencia doméstica y de drogadicción— en las primeras etapas de su construcción. Foto de Melinda Wilson.En total, 6.954 casas fueron destruidas, 359 sufrieron daños graves y 516, daños menores. “La estructura de madera de la mayoría de las casas se desintegró en pequeños pedazos”, según el informe de Davis. “Esto produjo miles de proyectiles mortales”.Casi todos los edificios comerciales en una extensión de seis cuadras de la calle Central [Main Street] quedaron seriamente averiados o destruidos, como lo fueron varios almacenes de grandes superficies en una franja comercial del este de Joplin. La escuela secundaria y el centro médico también quedaron destruidos.Más de 15.000 vehículos de diversos tamaños y pesos, incluidos autobuses, remolques de tractores y furgonetas fueron lanzados a más de 300 metros, a varias cuadras de distancia, algunos de los cuales quedaron aplastados y enrollados  y del todo irreconocibles, explicó Davis, añadiendo que algunos propietarios nunca encontraron sus vehículos.“Algunos vehículos fueron comprimidos y enrollados en torno a los pocos árboles que quedaron en pie, mientras otros se convirtieron en bolas.  Las armaduras de acero centrales de los techos se plegaron como si fueran de papel, y las principales vigas de apoyo quedaron torcidas o curvadas”, proseguía el informe. “Partes de los árboles que quedaron en pie estaban descortezados y desnudos”.La tormenta arrancó el asfalto del piso de un estacionamiento desde la base y lanzó los fragmentos, en algunos casos, a varias calles de distancia. Arrancó también los contenes de estacionamiento hechos de concreto, que pesaban de 90 a 140 kgs. y que estaban fijos al suelo con varillas de acero, y los lanzó a 20 y 40 metros de distancia.“Hubo también algunas cosas interesantes, tales como una silla de madera que quedó empotrada con las cuatro patas en un muro exterior de madera y estuco, y una manguera de goma que atravesó un árbol”, apuntó David.La Rda. Lauren Lyon, secretaria de la Diócesis de Misurí Occidental, dijo que la devastación era “increíble”.“Realmente te infunde un respeto por las fuerzas de la naturaleza y todo el concepto de ‘esta frágil tierra, nuestro hogar insular’, como dice el Libro de Oración; que todo el poder que somos capaces de reunir para someter el mundo natural a nuestra voluntad con frecuencia no se equipara a las fuerzas de la naturaleza”, subrayó.Dieciséis familias de San Felipe fueron afectadas por el tornado, según Sierra. Doce de ellas perdieron sus hogares y cuatro sus negocios. Los hogares de otros diez feligreses sufrieron daños menores.“Todo el mundo está de regreso a casas adecuadas y nos alegramos de eso”, dijo Sierra, añadiendo que algunas personas sólo habían vuelto a sus hogares recientemente.Un grupo de episcopales ayuda a pintar el interior de Rose Cottage. Foto de Peggy RalstonPoco después de la tormenta, muchas personas de toda la diócesis y de la Iglesia quisieron ayudar y Lyon contó que se les dijo que lo mejor serían las donaciones monetarias, porque podrían aplicarse a proyectos específicos o según fueran apareciendo las necesidades.Los donantes contribuyeron con algo más de $100.000 en respuesta al llamado de la diócesis, según dijo Lyon.“Somos afortunados por el apoyo que la Iglesia [en su sentido denominacional] nos ha dado”, dijo Sierra.Aproximadamente una semana después del tornado, el clero y la feligresía de las tres congregaciones episcopales se reunieron con algunos miembros del liderazgo diocesano para empezar a decidir “lo que pensábamos que podíamos hacer de utilidad, tanto inmediatamente como a largo plazo”, según explicó Wilson.Entre las ideas que se barajaron: ventas de garaje donde todos los objetos fuesen gratuitos, conectar la agencia con un vivero forestal extinto que tenía árboles para donar dirigir un programa para ayudar a replantar árboles en Joplin y encontrar una manera de ayudar con lo que era una intensa crisis de vivienda en la ciudad.Por ese tiempo, muchas agencias con experiencia en la construcción de viviendas, tales como Hábitat para la Humanidad, ya estaban respondiendo. “Estaban sobre el terreno haciendo planos y no queríamos tratar de competir con ellos, particularmente porque no contamos con los recursos para intentar tal cosa”, señaló Wise.Fue durante esa conversación que Katie Platt, una feligresa de Grace que trabajaba como consejera en Lafayette House, sugirió que un hogar transicional significaría “una solución más a largo plazo para más familias”.El terreno ya estaba disponible y el Rdo. Ted Estes, de Todos los Santos, que dice ser un “muchacho del pueblo”, negoció la compra de la propiedad —para lo que se llamará Rose Cottage— con James Herron, el nieto de los dueños del Rose’s Market. El mercado se encontraba enfrente de una escuela que es ahora Lafayette House. Según Wise, los estudiantes solían cruzar la calle para ir a la tienda a comprar caramelos.Estes dijo que cuando le explicó al propietario que los episcopales querían abrir un albergue para víctimas de violencia doméstica en la localidad, Herron “gentilmente nos vendió la propiedad a menos precio”. Una donación de la Diócesis de Misurí ayudó a la compra, señaló Estes.Luego vino un largo proceso de construcción, entre cuyas dificultades se incluía encontrar un contratista que estuviera disponible y encontrar uno que pudiera lidiar con el papeleo que conllevaba la constante actualización de los códigos locales de edificación.Jeff Neely, contratista episcopal radicado en Carthage, trazó gratuitamente los planos de Rose Cottage. La casa de tres dormitorios y dos baños cuenta con un “cuarto de seguridad” de hormigón vaciado a nivel del suelo concebido para proporcionar refugio en caso de tornados.Según dijo Lyon, la construcción de la casa costó aproximadamente los $100.000 que donó la Diócesis de Misurí Occidental, y las Mujeres Episcopales (ECW, por su sigla en inglés) de la diócesis han estado haciendo acopio de algunos artículos, tales como sábanas y toallas, platos, ollas y sartenes, así como pequeños aparatos electrodomésticos. ECW también está solicitando a las congregaciones de la diócesis que amueblen la casa, dijo Wise. Algunos miembros de las parroquias hay ayudado a pintar el interior, y también se planea plantar un jardín —incluidas rosas para el Rose Cottage.ECW ha tomado Rose Cottage como un proyecto permanente, de manera que las familias que pasen tiempo allí puedan llevarse algunos artículos de uso doméstico cuando se muden a sus propias casas, según explicó Estes. Han abierto un registro en una tienda local, de manera que los donantes puedan ayudar a comprar reemplazos para las próximas familias, agregó.Todos los que participan [de este proyecto] dijeron que sería un momento de júbilo cuando Rose Cottage se convierta oficialmente en parte de Lafayette House el 20 de julio, aunque ha sido un proceso frustrante de cierta manera porque la gente quería haber concluido algo útil mucho antes que dos años después del tornado.“Sí entendemos el porqué y sí queremos lograr que esto se haga bien, pero ha habido alguna frustración en que Joplin está volviendo en sí, pero no está recuperada todavía”, dijo Wise.Lyon dijo que los participantes han aprendido que “el proceso de recuperación y reconstrucción es lento y exige una tremenda cantidad de fe y de compromiso con un propósito. Reconstruir después de una desgracia de esas proporciones sencillamente no puede ocurrir de la noche a la mañana, y a las personas les lleva tiempo recuperarse de eso; a las comunidades también les lleva tiempo”.Dos años después, la recuperación todavía no es completa. Wise, que llama a Joplin “mi gran ciudad”, dijo que cuando el va de compras o sale a comer, su impresión es que “que todo el pueblo está deprimido, como si la ciudad entera estuviera en un estado permanente de síndrome postraumático”.No ayuda el que el tornado no fuera en absoluto un evento inusual. Intensas tormentas se produjeron en la zona durante el fin de semana del 18 y 19 de mayo de este año y el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional emitió una alerta de tornado el 20 de mayo para 26 condados de Misurí, incluido el de Joplin. Esa es la manera de vivir en esta época del año en el Corredor de los Tornados.Pero, Sierra agregó que “si vuelve a suceder, lidiaremos con eso. Dios estará con nosotros. Él siempre ha estado con nosotros a través de este tiempo”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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Los peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney siguen compartiendo su viaje y haciéndose…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Africa, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Los peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney siguen compartiendo su viaje y haciéndose promotores de los refugiados Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries, Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA center_img A principios de marzo, un grupo de episcopales que tomó parte en una peregrinación de #ShareTheJourney a la región africana de los Grandes Lagos visitó la oficina de la Organización Internacional para la Migración en Kigali, Ruanda, donde se reunieron con Didacus Obunga, director de operaciones de esa institución —que aparece a la derecha— y con el Dr. Samuel A. Baghuma, médico del [Servicio] Nacional de Salud para la Migración —que se ve al centro. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] La Iglesia Episcopal ha estado reasentando refugiados durante 75 años, y trabajando con congregaciones locales y agencias de reasentamiento a través de Estados Unidos para darle acogida a algunas de las personas más vulnerables del mundo que huyen de la violencia, la guerra y la opresión política, étnica y cultural.A principios de marzo, ocho episcopales viajaron a Kenia y a Ruanda para aprender cómo es el reasentamiento de refugiados en la actualidad a través de las lentes de refugiados congoleses en una peregrinación de #ShareTheJourney organizada por el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el servicio de reasentamiento de refugiados de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS).La DFMS [Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society] es el nombre con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión.“Nuestra esperanza”, dijo Deborah Stein, directora del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, “es que los participantes puedan compartir el entusiasmo que han mostrado a través de esta peregrinación con las personas de sus parroquias, de sus comunidades, de sus diócesis, y convertirse en campeones y promotores de los refugiados: comunicarle a la Iglesia en su sentido más amplio las maravillosas oportunidades que tienen los episcopales que participan en la labor salvavidas del reasentamiento de refugiados, y en última instancia que los episcopales vean que existe un lugar para ellos en este quehacer”.Alyssa Stebbing, directora de servicios comunitarios de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity] de The Woodlands en la Diócesis de Texas, fue a la peregrinación con una conciencia acerca de los refugiados que se acrecentó durante el viaje.“Esta experiencia realmente me ha quitado las anteojeras”, dijo Stebbing, quien se propone participar con la comunidad interreligiosa del área metropolitana de Houston y compartir lo que ella ha aprendido en la peregrinación.El Ministerio Episcopal de Migración es una de nueve agencias asociadas con el Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. para acoger y reasentar refugiados en Estados Unidos. A través de la Iglesia, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración colabora con 30 comunidades en 26 diócesis.De los 15,5 millones de refugiados en todo el mundo, menos de un 1 por ciento serán reasentados, de los cuales más de un 75 por ciento vendrá a Estados Unidos.El Dr. Muddassar Ban Abad, que supervisa el Centro de Evaluación de la Salud de la Organización Internacional para la Migración en Nairobi, Kenia, conduce a los peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney en un recorrido por las instalaciones. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.En 2014, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración y sus asociados ayudaron a reasentar a 5.155 de las decenas de miles de refugiados que llegaron a Estados Unidos a través del proceso de selección del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (UNHCR). Ellos se esforzarán en servir a otras tantas personas este año, de los 70.000 refugiados que Estados Unidos planea reasentar.Muchos de esos refugiados provendrán de la República Democrática del Congo. A lo largo de los próximos años, el UNHCR se propone reasentar 50.000 refugiados del Congo, el 80 por ciento de los cuales vendrán a Estados Unidos.La peregrinación, que se extendió del 2 al 13 de marzo, financiada por una subvención del Fondo Constable de la Iglesia Episcopal, instruyó a los participantes en la difícil situación de los refugiados y en el proceso que deben seguir [para obtener refugio], de manera que puedan compartir su experiencia con sus iglesias, diócesis y comunidades.En Ruanda, visitaron Gihembe, un campamento que alberga a 14,500 refugiados provenientes del Congo Oriental. Allí escucharon preguntas y preocupaciones de los refugiados en el contexto de una reunión comunitaria. Los peregrinos también se impusieron del proceso de reasentamiento desde una perspectiva exterior a través de reuniones con el UNHCR, el Centro de Apoyo al Reasentamiento en África del Servicio Mundial de Iglesias y otras organizaciones no gubernamentales.El Rdo. Frank Logue, canónigo del Ordinario en la Diócesis de Georgia, les habla a los refugiados durante una reunión comunitaria en el campamento de refugiados de Gihembe. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Para el Rdo. Frank Logue, canónigo del Ordinario en la Diócesis de Georgia, poder reunirse con los refugiados y escuchar sus frustraciones respecto al proceso de reasentamiento resultó ilustrativo.“Creo que es difícil para cualquiera de nosotros apreciar lo que es huir de su país, lo que significa ser un refugiado, de manera que haber tenido la experiencia de reunirme y hablar con los refugiados resultó provechosa”, dijo Logue, que viajó con su esposa, Victoria.La visita al campamento de refugiados incluyó un recorrido por su clínica sanitaria, un aula de una escuela primaria, una iniciativa para la capacitación de mujeres y un aula de inglés como segundo idioma para refugiados que ya han sido aprobados para el reasentamiento.Reunirse con 10 mujeres portadoras del VIH en el campamento de refugiados, que encuentran esperanza en plantar hongos, le hizo una gran impresión a Cookie Cantwell, coordinadora del ministerio de los jóvenes en la IV Provincia.“Una vez que uno se ve expuesto a algo que sabes que cambiará para siempre tu perspectiva, tienes que compartirlo”, dijo Cantwell, que proviene de la Diócesis de Carolina del Este. “Una vez que has sido tocada, tienes que tomar una decisión sobre lo que vas a hacer al respecto”.Una refugiada somalí que trabaja como asistente de salud de la comunidad posa con Cookie Cantwell, durante una visite a Refugee Point, una organización que se dedica a capacitar a algunas de las refugiadas más vulnerables en Nairobi y otras localidades del mundo entero. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Para Cantwell eso significa compartir la historia de las mujeres. “Están viviendo, no se están muriendo”, afirmó.Muchos de los peregrinos compartieron sus experiencias en blogs.“Una de las cosas que les pedimos a todos los peregrinos que han participado en el viaje de #ShareTheJourney es que, cuando regresen a sus hogares, utilicen su experiencia para hablarles a tantas personas como les sea posible a fin de compartir lo que han aprendido: convertirse en promotores de los refugiados, visitar una oficina local de EMM, ver lo que sucede en el otro extremo donde reciben a los refugiados, ver lo que pueden hacer para compartir la información de lo que aprendieron mientras estuvieron en Nairobi [en Kenia] y en Ruanda”, dijo Stein.Jessica Benson, de la Diócesis de Idaho, había entablado una relación con una familia congolesa reasentada en Boise a través de la Agencia para Nuevos Americanos. Pero ver el proceso de reasentamiento desde el extremo opuesto fue una experiencia completamente distinta, dijo ella.Los peregrinos aprendieron, por ejemplo, que una vez que a una familia la destinan para reasentamiento y comienza el lento proceso de los antecedentes, los exámenes médicos y de seguridad, cualquier cambio en el estatus familiar, tal como el nacimiento de un niño, puede retrasar el proceso.“Una de las cosas que se fijó en mi mente es que los niños son examinados al mismo nivel de los adultos”, dijo Benson, añadiendo que ella tampoco conoció a muchos refugiados que vivieran en ciudades, fuera de los campamentos.Antes de que la peregrinación hubiera terminado, Benson ya se había puesto al habla con un legislador estatal para coordinar una reunión. Ella también se proponía hablarles a los estudiantes, en el sistema de educación pública donde el número de estudiantes refugiados haya aumentado, a fin de educarlos en el proceso de reasentamiento, afirmó.Alice Eshuchi, directora nacional de Heshima en Kenia, conversa con Alyssa Stebbing, directora de servicios comunitarios de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad en The Woodlands, Diócesis de Texas, durante una visita a la oficina de operaciones de Heshima. Heshima Kenya se especializa en identificar y proteger a niños y jóvenes que aparecen solos y separados de sus familias, especialmente niñas y mujeres jóvenes y sus hijos que viven en Nairobi. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Luego de visitar el campamento de refugiados en Ruanda, los peregrinos visitaron Heshima, un programa urbano en Nairobi, Kenia, que se dedica a capacitar a niñas y mujeres jóvenes, muchas de las cuales han perdido a sus familias o se encuentran separadas de ellas.Para Spencer Cantrell, miembro del Proyecto Nacional de Defensa de las Mujeres Inmigrantes en Washington, D.C., el contraste entre el campamento de refugiados y el programa urbano era pasmoso. En el campamento, ella visitó el alojamiento de un hombre que había perdido toda esperanza, a pesar de que su familia había sido reasentada en Misisipí. Eso era difícil de reconciliar con la esperanza que emanaba de las actitudes positivas de las niñas y mujeres jóvenes en Nairobi, muchas de ellas sobrevivientes de traumas y violencia sexual y muchas de ellas madres adolescentes, dice ella.“Estoy buscando los medios de compartir esto con la Iglesia”, dijo Cantrell, ex misionera en Hong Kong con el Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos, que ahora vive en la Diócesis de Washington.Entrar en un aula en el campamento de refugiados llena de muchachos impacientes, cuatro años por debajo de su nivel de escolaridad y compartiendo dos o tres libros, resultó descorazonador para el Rdo. Burl Salmon, capellán de una escuela intermedia y decano de vida comunitaria en la escuela episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity Episcopal School] en la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte. Sin embargo, el se sintió alentado por la compenetración que el maestro tenía con sus alumnos, dijo. “Él veía la educación como la puerta que ellos tenían para alcanzar el éxito”.“La educación es universal”, dijo Salmon. “Para uno es un salvavidas y para el otro es un hecho”.De vuelta a Estados Unidos, además de establecer relaciones con una oficina afiliada al Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, entre las formas en que los peregrinos y otros episcopales pueden seguir aprendiendo sobre los refugiados y seguir abogando por ellos se incluyen: organizar un evento para el Día Mundial del Refugiado, que tiene lugar anualmente el 20 de junio; animar a una congregación a copatrocinar a una familia refugiada; compartir sus experiencias con refugiados en la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal; abogar por los refugiados en la esfera local y estatal mediante citas con funcionarios electos y hablando en reuniones cívicas, y hacerse miembro de la Red Episcopal de Política Pública, que participa en política pública a escala federal.Una de las cosas que la Iglesia Episcopal, que está presente en muchos países, debería de hacer es alentar a otros países a aumentar el número de refugiados que reasientan, dijo el Rdo. canónigo Scott Gunn, de la Diócesis de Ohio Sur, uno de los peregrinos y director ejecutivo del Movimiento Adelante [Forward Movement], un ministerio de la Iglesia episcopal con sede en Cincinnati, Ohio, que estimula el discipulado.Hay 2,7 millones de refugiados y solicitantes de asilo en África Oriental, en el Cuerno de África y en la región de los Grandes Lagos. Etiopía y Kenia acogen a la mayoría de las personas que huyen de la violencia y la inestabilidad política en Somalia, Sudán del Sur, Eritrea y el Congo.“Noventa y nueve por ciento de los refugiados no serán reasentados”, dijo Gunn. “También debemos hacer todo lo que podamos para influir en la estabilización de las condiciones en África Oriental; un país está recibiendo los refugiados de otro país.“Si 2,7 millones de personas pudieran ser repatriadas, todo el mundo saldría ganando. Es un juego moralmente escandaloso el que se lleva a cabo con las vidas de las personas”, dijo Gunn. “Ningún ser humano debería jamás tener que pronunciar estas palabras: ‘yo no tengo esperanza’”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Por Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 13, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Refugees Migration & Resettlement Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Immigration, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Residentes del Condado de Montgomery con la esperanza de recibir…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Por Paulette E. MartinPosted Apr 29, 2016 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Aunque la mayor parte del agua ha retrocedido, los residentes del Condado de Montgomery se enfrentan ahora a una dura realidad después de las inundaciones históricas que devastaron el área  metropolitana de Houston la semana pasada— muchos tienen casas inhabitables y otros no cuentan con la ayuda federal de FEMA.Más de 13 pulgadas de lluvia cayeron en seis horas y en algunos lugares cayeron más de 16. Más de siete muertes han sido confirmados durante la inundación del mes de abril.  El suelo saturado significa que la lluvia continua siendo una amenaza para más inundaciones. Funcionarios diocesanos mandaron inmediatamente equipos de atención espiritual a las zonas afectadas para visitar a las víctimas y repartir tarjetas de regalo. El Archidiácono Russ Oechsel y el Rvdo. Canónigo Michael Bamberger, un coordinador de la preparación de desastres con Episcopal Relief and Development continúan evaluando las necesidades y trabajarán en un plan de largo plazo para ayudar con los esfuerzos de recuperación.Las calles en los vecindarios de Timber Lakes y Timber Ridge en la ciudad de The Woodlands parecen una zona de desastre con colchones, muebles y placas de yeso apilados fuera de las casas.El olor a moho impregna el aire en las calles y rastros del alto nivel de agua todavía son evidentes en el exterior de las casas—para algunas residencias llegó a nivel de la cintura.Las fuertes lluvias e inundaciones afectaron a aproximadamente 280 residencias en el condado de Montgomery. El Presidente Barak Obama emitió una declaración de desastre para los condados de Harris, Grimes, Parker y Fayette permitiendo a los residentes de esos condados ser elegibles para asistencia de FEMA, pero el condado de Montgomery, donde se encuentran muchos hogares afectados, no fue incluido en esta lista.La iglesia Trinity, The Woodlands y otras iglesias de la Diócesis de Texas están trabajando con Episcopal Relief and Development para desarrollar un programa de recuperación a largo plazo, y también tratan de ampliar la conciencia para quienes necesitan ayuda en el Condado de Montgomery.Aunque el condado de Montgomery fue incluido en la declaración del estado del gobernador Greg Abbott como zona de desastre, Bamberger, quien también es rector de la iglesia Ascensión en Sierra Madre, California, cree que los residentes todavía tienen la oportunidad de ser incluidos en la declaración de FEMA.“Las declaraciones pueden ser modificadas todo el tiempo… Cuando se dan cuenta que varios residentes afectados han llamado a FEMA y se registraron, eso va a poner más presión sobre ellos”, dijo Bamberger. “Descubran quienes son los encargados del condado y también déjenles saber que necesitan su ayuda”.Carlos Rincón Gallardo, residente del vecindario Timber Lakes perdió casi todas sus pertenencias. La noche de la tormenta, regresó a la cama cuando se fue la luz, sólo para despertar con altos niveles de agua dentro de su casa.“Habíamos perdido la electricidad… así que decidí volver a la cama”, dijo Gallardo. “Cuando toqué el suelo estaba mojado. Desperté a mi esposa, a todos. Tuve la oportunidad de sacar los coches. No más de seis minutos pasaron y el agua me llegaba hasta aquí (señala a la cintura). Tengo un bebé. Cuando salí de mi casa, yo estaba sosteniendo al bebé (sube sus brazos en el aire) y seguía lloviendo. Nosotros sólo logramos salvar nuestros coches y eso fue todo “.A pesar de perder casi todo después de haber sido inundado tres veces, Gallardo afirma que está bendecido, y le ofrece consejos a otras víctimas.“Obtenga un seguro a través de FEMA si usted sabe de antemano que está viviendo en un área propensa a las inundaciones. O no permanezca en una casa que podría inundarse. Es mejor vivir en otro lugar. Quizás sea un poquito más caro o no sea tan bonito, pero no vale la pena perder todo por vivir en esa casa”, advirtió Gallardo.Otras organizaciones también se han asociado con la iglesia Trinity para ayudar. Missy Herndon, Presidenta y CEO de Interfaith of The Woodlands y de Interfaith Community Clinic dijo que el objetivo de la organización es evaluar las necesidades y proporcionar la ayuda.“Vamos de puerta a puerta y entregamos información sobre nuestra organización para que la gente sepa lo que hacemos”, dice Herndon. “Hasta ahora hemos colocado 17 personas en refugios y hemos ayudado a 30 familias.”Interfaith of The Woodlands tendrá un “Día de Compras” en el Centro Comunitario del Sur del Condado para darle a las víctimas la oportunidad de escoger todo lo que necesiten: pañales, sábanas, toallas y ropa. El evento se llevará a cabo el viernes 29 de abril a partir de 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.La mayoría de las iglesias episcopales en las zonas inundadas sufrieron pérdidas menores. Algunas tuvieron filtraciones de agua y daños en el techo. Uno de nuestros clérigos tuvo que ser rescatado por kayak a las 4 a.m. y su iglesia se inundó. Otras iglesias respondieron rápidamente a los feligreses que necesitaban ayuda y continúan con esta misión.La Diócesis Episcopal de Texas también ha creado una cuenta de donaciones para ayudar con necesidades a medida que se evalúan.La iglesia Santa María, Cypress está organizando jornadas de trabajo para las personas de todas las edades y ayudar a sus vecinos en la limpieza de escombros, muebles, preparando sándwiches, asistencia, y, sobre todo, con la oración y un lugar seguro para que todos sean bienvenidos. También estarán repartiendo las tarjetas de regalo de Wal-Mart. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Residentes del Condado de Montgomery con la esperanza de recibir ayuda de FEMA después de las tormentas catastróficas TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

EU Referendum: Statement by the Archbishop of Dublin

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Responding to the U.K.’s EU referendum, the Primate of the Southern Province of the Church of Ireland, the Most Rev. Michael Jackson, Archbishop of Dublin and Bishop of Glendalough, issued the following statement.At this time of considerable uncertainty for the people of Ireland following the outcome of the referendum on continuing EU membership in the United Kingdom, our hopes and prayers are for stability and clarity in finding the best path forward.Many people in Ireland fear the impact that this momentous decision will have on their lives in ways that are still incalculable and unknown. We pray for wisdom and foresight on the part of those who lead us politically, socially and economically and for those who will negotiate on our behalf on how best to express and fulfil our role in Ireland within the European Union. Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME EU Referendum The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group EU Referendum: Statement by the Archbishop of Dublin Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Jun 24, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

First Latina dean inspires through leadership, strong faith

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Very Rev. Miguelina Howell is the first Latina dean in the Episcopal Church. She was installed as dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford, Connecticut, in February. Photo: Amanda Trahan[Episcopal News Service] Remembering the sounds of traditional Anglican hymns accompanied with merengue beats transport the Very Rev. Miguelina “Lina” Howell back to the Episcopal Church in the Dominican Republic, where her fire for ministry was ignited.Howell remembers as a child the joy of participating in church and hearing the beautiful worship music. A lifelong Episcopalian, she watched her parents serve as lay leaders in their church and was inspired to get involved too. At 8 years old, she became an acolyte and was an “honorary” member of the church altar guild. Her father was the sexton of their church and together they would arrive early on Sunday mornings to set up the altar.“A long-lasting impact of my time serving in the Episcopal Church in the Dominican Republic was the opportunity to experience the profound sense of joy and commitment of lay leaders as they fully engaged in God’s mission in their communities and the vibrant nature of the ministry of Episcopal schools across the diocese,” said Howell, who last February became the first Hispanic woman called to serve as a cathedral dean in the Episcopal Church.Howell became the 10th dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford, Connecticut, in February.A life-altering experience 26 years ago confirmed Howell’s calling to the priesthood. At 16 years old, she attended a youth event at Misión Santa Cruz, an Episcopal church in the Province of San Pedro de Marcorís, and saw a woman celebrating the Eucharist for the first time.“It was the most relevant ‘aha’ moment of my life,” she said. “When I saw the Rev. Margarita Santana, the first female ordained to the priesthood in the Dominican Republic, behind the altar, it was clear to me that serving God’s people as an ordained minister was possible for me as well.”This moment of discernment shaped everything that followed, from Howell’s decision to study clinical psychology to attending seminary. A few years later, she was appointed to serve as youth ministry coordinator for Province IX, and in 1997, she represented the pre-Lambeth young adult gathering in England. She also received a degree in theology from Centro de Estudios Teologicos in Santo Domingo and her license as a clinical psychologist from Universidad Pedro Henriquez in the Dominican Republic.Howell was ordained to the diaconate in 2002 and to the priesthood in 2003. She served first in the Dominican Republic, planting two churches and a school and working with youth. She also was elected twice to fill vacancies on the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council.Miguelina Howell meets Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey. Photo: Courtesy of Miguelina HowellIn 2008, her life took a big turn: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Patterson, New Jersey, invited her to serve as associate rector. Accepting the call meant leaving behind her country and her home, and making a new life in the United States. Not only did she have to leave her family, but she also had to minister in English, which was not her first language. This was one of her biggest challenges, she said. She was also dating her now-husband Daniel Howell, an American, so love also played a role in her move, she said.“I came to this country with a whole lot of faith, two suitcases and a box of books, trusting God’s will in my life. I experienced a significant amount of inner peace about the decision to explore new territory away from my homeland,” she said. “At times, it was challenging for my family and friends to understand my choice and I am thankful they supported me throughout my transition and beyond.”Now at 40 years old, she is the first Hispanic woman dean in the Episcopal Church.Her position has inspired other Latinos in the Episcopal Church including the Rev. Anthony Guillén, the Episcopal Church’s officer for Latino and Hispanic ministries.“We have been ordaining women for 40 years and even at this stage, the church (hierarchy) is predominately male … so for a woman to be a dean of a cathedral is a big thing, and the fact that she is the first Latina dean of a cathedral, the two things together are a real code of pride for the people from the Dominican Republic who saw her grow up and saw her leadership. … They are very proud of her and those of us Latinos in the church are proud of her,” said Guillén.Christ Church Cathedral invited Howell to serve as vicar in 2013. During that time, the church was between deans and was looking for a dean who could help serve their new Latino community and the parish.Miguelina Howell with the 24th presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Most Rev. Edmond Lee Browning, now deceased, and his wife Patti.The cathedral was studying how to become a 21st-century cathedral and wanted a dean that could help lead this new vision, said the Rev. Timothy Hodapp, an associate priest and the Diocese of Connecticut’s canon for mission collaboration. Howell’s youth, her ability to communicate strongly in both English and Spanish, her gift of understanding people and bringing them together, and her extensive experience in ministry and strong faith were qualities that made her an excellent candidate for the position.“Her greatest strength is that she is a believer in Jesus Christ and she has the heart of a priest,” said Hodapp.She has already made an impact with her leadership: She has reached out to surrounding schools, other denominational churches and local officials including the mayor’s office to find out how they can all work together, he said.Howell recognizes the significance of her historic position and hopes to inspire other women to ordained ministry; however, she said her main focus is being a child of God who is willing and ready to serve.“For me it’s not about my gender or ethnicity, it’s about the God-given gifts bestowed upon me as a child of God to serve God’s mission at Christ Church Cathedral and the larger Episcopal Church,” she said. “Being a woman and a Latina are aspects of my identity that I cherish and I do recognize how those aspects enrich my ministry and allow me to serve God’s ever changing, multicultural church in a unique way.“This has been the most exciting 10 months of my ministry in the United States. … Every day is a new day.  God is doing a new thing in the Episcopal Church in Connecticut and I am blessed to be part of it.”– Erica Tricarico is a bilingual multimedia journalist from Cedar Grove, New Jersey. Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL December 19, 2016 at 4:05 pm We are grateful that The Very Rev. Miguelina Howell has recorded the Anglican History course for Academia Ecuménica de Liderazgo (Ecumenical Lay Leadership Academy). ¡Muchas gracias! Thank you for your courage, strength, and perseverance before adversity, Miguelina. Thanks too for your support, your commitment, and your generous and kind heart. You are an inspiration to many. Let us remain in prayer for God’s help and blessings in all things.Eduardo Solomón RiveraCoordinator, Academia Ecuménica de Liderazgo (TEC)Managing Editor, EfM LatinxForma Board Member Vivian M. Varela says: December 16, 2016 at 3:23 pm We are so blessed to have Lina as the Dean of our Cathedral! She is an inspiration to all as we seek new ways to participate in God’s mission here in Connecticut and beyond. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Erica TricaricoPosted Dec 16, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL PJcabbiness says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT December 20, 2016 at 1:00 pm Felicidades Dean Miguelina! This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Eduardo Solomón Rivera says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH December 16, 2016 at 3:47 pm Congratulations and felicitations and … many, many blessings, Dean Miguelina! I know the Cathedral well from my days as Rector of St John’s, North Haven (1974-88). Dean Steve Gushee invited us to preside at the daily Eucharist in the Chapel of the Cathedral once a month. I always enjoyed doing that and have been inspired to try it here at our Cathedral (Trinity, Portland, OR). I don’t think it would work, however; and it’s sad! Still I’m delighted to hear about your appointment and am especially taken with English being your second language. Spanish is sort of my “second language,” but not at all adept in it, except for presiding, preaching and occasionally (with lots of help) conversing! Bless you! Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY December 17, 2016 at 5:31 pm Miguelina,It was a joy serving with you at Nuevo Amanecer and sharing a FB friendship. Not only do you inspire many, you are a loving, spiritual woman who is a true blessing to the Church.May you have many years of joy-filled service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Women’s Ministry Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Maureen-Elizabeth Hagen says: Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Fr Phillip Ayers says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME December 21, 2016 at 7:13 pm Good job. Great story. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Rt. Rev. Ian T. Douglas says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 First Latina dean inspires through leadership, strong faith Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (6) Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more